Publications

Illinois Bar Journal
Articles on Law Pulse

Pet project By Helen W. Gunnarsson December 2002 Lawpulse, Page 628 More and more estate-planning clients want to make sure that Fluffy is well provided for. Here's how to help them.
The supremes say “no” to a taxpayer suit against Gov. Ryan By Helen W. Gunnarsson December 2002 Lawpulse, Page 628 In Lyons v Ryan, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that taxpayers lack standing to sue for damages caused by the licenses-for-bribes scheme because the attorney general alone has the authority to initiate litigation on behalf of the state.
Whither estate-planning practice? By Helen W. Gunnarsson December 2002 Lawpulse, Page 628 Demographic trends and tax-law changes may generate some short-term business, but they'll mean less work for estate-planning lawyers in the long run. Are you ready to adjust your practice?
Child support: pending privatization of the SDU raises concerns By Helen W. Gunnarsson November 2002 Lawpulse, Page 578 State officials say there's no cause for alarm, but some lawyers worry that changing vendors could once again muddle the child-support distribution system.
Clash over class actions By Helen W. Gunnarsson November 2002 Lawpulse, Page 578 Madison County is at the center of a dispute over class-action filings.
The devil in the details of domestic-partner benefits By Helen W. Gunnarsson November 2002 Lawpulse, Page 578 More employers are offering benefits to their employees' nonspouse partners. Here are some of the legal and administrative issues they need to consider.
Do trial lawyers have the Country behind them? By Helen W. Gunnarsson November 2002 Lawpulse, Page 578 A recent case interpreting language that appears in many Country Companies insurance policies has the plaintiffs' bar buzzing.
College saving in Illinois; a new carrot and stick By Helen W. Gunnarsson October 2002 Lawpulse, Page 506 Illinois residents have another incentive to invest in Illinois' Bright Start college savings program; and a disincentive to participate in plans offered by other states.
Fee tax turns employment-lawsuit winner into loser By Helen W. Gunnarsson October 2002 Lawpulse, Page 506 Taxing attorney fee awards as income to the plaintiff threatens to reduce an employee's award to less than zero.
Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court keeps its eyes on the spies By Helen W. Gunnarsson October 2002 Lawpulse, Page 506 A brief history of the federal court that reviews the propriety of foreign intelligence wiretaps, which recently made news by denying a wiretap request for only the second time in 20-plus years.
The power of special interrogatories By Helen W. Gunnarsson October 2002 Lawpulse, Page 506 They're a useful tool for the plaintiffs' bar as well as the defense, a trial lawyer says.
The truth about mold By Helen W. Gunnarsson October 2002 Lawpulse, Page 506 If you practice real-estate law, it's time you learned the moldy facts.
Corporate reform bill tough on lawyers By Helen W. Gunnarsson September 2002 Lawpulse, Page 448 Ironically, the SEC was lukewarm to less stringent ethics rules urged by a U of I law prof and colleagues last spring.
Is E-mail Subject to the Open Meetings Act? By Helen W. Gunnarsson September 2002 Lawpulse, Page 448 Some e-mail exchanges between public board members might constitute meetings and thus implicate the Open Meetings Act.
New law will help trustees avoid Hobson’s Choice By Helen W. Gunnarsson September 2002 Lawpulse, Page 448 SB 1697, now awaiting Gov. Ryan's signature, will make it easier for trustees of certain commonly used trusts to invest the principal so as to benefit both income and remainder beneficiaries.
The varying standards of client capacity By Helen W. Gunnarsson September 2002 Lawpulse, Page 448 Making a will, signing a deed, executing a POA for property; they all require different standards of competence. What are they, and what do they mean for you and your clients?
Bill would require clergy to report abuse By Helen W. Gunnarsson August 2002 Lawpulse, Page 392 HB 5002 would add clergy to the list of required reporters under the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act.
Employers need not hire workers for jobs that threaten health By Helen W. Gunnarsson August 2002 Lawpulse, Page 392 The ADA does not require employers to hire employees for jobs that would pose a "direct threat" to the candidates health, the Supreme Court ruled.
Illinois Supreme Court cares for caretakers By Helen W. Gunnarsson August 2002 Lawpulse, Page 392 The high court upholds the Probate Act provision that allows a claim against the estate by selected relatives who serve as custodial caretakers.
A new — and overdue — Uniform Partnership Act By Helen W. Gunnarsson August 2002 Lawpulse, Page 392 Partnership will become an even more attractive form of business organization under the revised Act. But when will lawyers be able to form LLPs?
New limits on attorney-client privilege for government lawyers and agency clients By Helen W. Gunnarsson August 2002 Lawpulse, Page 392 The seventh circuit holds that when federal prosecutors seek information from an agency attorney as part of a criminal investigation, the agency lawyer must talk.
Bill requiring DNA samples awaits Ryan’s signature By Helen W. Gunnarsson July 2002 Lawpulse, Page 338 Prosecutors and criminal defense attorneys alike praise the legislation, which requires everyone convicted of a felony to provide DNA for a statewide database.
Boyd laid down the law on spoliation By Helen W. Gunnarsson July 2002 Lawpulse, Page 338 Want to learn the law governing destruction of evidence in Illinois? Start with this 1995 Illinois Supreme Court decision.
Future injuries; the high court charts a new course By Helen W. Gunnarsson July 2002 Lawpulse, Page 338 When the Illinois Supreme Court held that plaintiffs can be compensated for the risk of future injury, it departed from precedent and followed the trend.
Perspectives on death-penalty reform By Helen W. Gunnarsson July 2002 Lawpulse, Page 338 A prosecutor and criminal defense attorney react to the recommendations of Governor Ryan's Commission on Capital Punishment.
Uncle Sam sidesteps tenancy-by-the-entirety restrictions By Helen W. Gunnarsson July 2002 Lawpulse, Page 338 A recent U.S. Supreme Court case holds that tax liens against one spouse attach to property held in tenancy by the entirety by both spouses, putting the IRS in a better position than other creditors.
…and to secretary of state’s office By Helen W. Gunnarsson June 2002 Lawpulse, Page 282 You can now file articles of incorporation by fax, with more soon to come.
The high court overturns Illinois grandparents’ visitation statute By Helen W. Gunnarsson June 2002 Lawpulse, Page 282 The Illinois Supreme Court rules that the grandparents' visitation law unconstitutionally infringes upon parents' rights.
High-tech filing comes to bankruptcy court… By Helen W. Gunnarsson June 2002 Lawpulse, Page 282 Bankruptcy court for Illinois' southern district now requires electronic filing.
New 7CA limits on arbitration agreements By Helen W. Gunnarsson June 2002 Lawpulse, Page 282 Employer-employee arbitration agreements that require each party to pay its own attorney fees in civil rights and sexual harassment cases are unenforceable, the seventh circuit rules.