Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Civil Unions

When is a spouse really a spouse? By Burton A. Gross Human Rights, October 2013 We all know that the meaning of the word “spouse” is evolving, and that evolution is occurring today at warp speed.
Supreme Court invalidation of DOMA provisions may require retirement and health plans to extend spousal benefits to Illinois civil union partners; May extend federal tax benefits By Adam M. Fleming Corporate Law Departments, August 2013 In light of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent landmark decision in U.S. v. Windsor, which invalidated Section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act, the full ramifications of the Supreme Court’s holding are just beginning to come into focus.
The tax effects of a civil union dissolution By Ray Prather and Padraig McCoid Federal Taxation, May 2013 While the Civil Union Act relies on the IMDMA for dissolving civil unions and dividing property; federal tax law does not account for these issues in dissolutions with same-sex parties (due to DOMA) and possibly all civil unions (due to the fact that the parties are not married). The Internal Revenue Service has not provided guidance for these issues.
Illinois marital deduction and Q-TIP election available to civil unions By Ray Prather Trusts and Estates, November 2012 The interaction between federal and state law has made it difficult for Illinois to implement its law recognizing civil unions.
Immigration update: Can civil union partners in Illinois apply for immigration benefits? By Shannon M. Shepherd Human Rights, November 2012 Are federal immigration benefits are available for our clients in same-sex relationships living in Illinois?
A case law overview for child custody disputes in civil union dissolutions By Sean McCumber Child Law, November 2011  A brief case law overview of custody and visitation issues for non-biological parents.
Illinois civil unions—will they provide immigration benefits to noncitizens? By Rebecca L. Warren International and Immigration Law, August 2011 A look at civil unions in the context of immigration—Can they be recognized for immigration purposes?
Immigration obstacles for same-sex couples civilly united in Illinois By Angela Rollins International and Immigration Law, August 2011 Even though same-sex couples can now enter into civil unions in Illinois, same-sex binational couples are unable to recognize the same benefits as married opposite-sex couples under the Immigration and Nationality Act.
Illinois Civil Union Act By Derek A. Schryer Employee Benefits, March 2011 Beginning on June 1, 2011, Illinois will recognize same-sex marriages, civil unions or other similar legal relations entered into in another jurisdiction as a civil union.
A first look at the Illinois Civil Union Act By Richard Felice and Camilla B. Taylor Family Law, February 2011 As this article demonstrates, the Illinois Civil Union Act requires lawyers dealing with civil unions to be attuned to both the law of other states and the interplay of the civil union with other areas of the law.
Immigration in the context of human rights: A focus on bi-national same sex couples By Natalie Vera Human Rights, May 2009 In today’s society, where there exists a rapidly evolving notion and composition of the family, our immigration laws are antiquated and incapable of securing and protecting the wide variety of family structures that exist in the United States.
Subtle changes to House Bill 1826 may result in a more perfect civil union By Jennifer A. Shaw Human Rights, September 2008 On February 23, 2007, Representative Greg Harris introduced House Bill 1826 – The Illinois Religious Freedom Protection and Civil Union Act.
Civil unions in Illinois – House Bill 1826 and Senate Bill 2436 By Jennifer A. Shaw Human Rights, April 2008 Two of the most important pending items of legislation affecting the human and civil rights of Illinois citizens are House Bill 1826 and Senate Bill 2436.
Representing unmarried couples: The need for Illinois legislative action By E. Lynn Grayson Women and the Law, March 2008 Legislative change is required to ensure the legal rights of unmarried couples are protected in Illinois.
Starting the debate: Should Illinois have same-sex marriage or civil unions? By Mark E. Wojcik Human Rights, January 2007 One of the most contentious national political issues is whether to recognize same-sex marriages, deny same-sex marriages, or create some sort of “compromise” that falls short of using the word “marriage,” but yet purports to grant a large number of tangible legal benefits to same-sex couples and their children.