Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Clients

My attorney won’t tell me what I should do! By Curt W. Ferguson Agricultural Law, November 2013 An attorney should not tell you what you want to accomplish, but should advise you how to accomplish your goals. It’s an important distinction to understand.
Client first aid: Look, listen, and feel By Katherine A. Chamberlain Young Lawyers Division, October 2013 The author shares her own system for client intake and management.
How effective law firm leadership practices can help you acquire and keep your clients By John W. Olmstead Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, June 2013 Law firms that fail to address leadership issues may find themselves unprepared for the future and unable to acquire new clients and retain existing clients.
Ensuring client confidentiality with best practices By Vincent Incopero Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, September 2012 As a prudent professional, are you aware of your professional and ethical obligations regarding the way that your practice handles personally identifiable information?
Preparing a will for a client with communication challenges By Gerry W. Beyer Trusts and Estates, April 2012 This article reviews a variety of communication challenges and recommends techniques to reduce the likelihood of these challenges playing a part in setting aside the testator’s will.
Managing expectations—Ours (The lawyers) and theirs (The clients) By Sandra Crawford Women and the Law, September 2011 The book, The New Lawyer, How Settlement is Transforming the Practice of Law, can serve as a starting place for any lawyer wishing to examine where she fits into the conflict resolution continuum.
So your client has given you physical evidence of a crime… By J. Randall Cox Traffic Laws and Courts, May 2011 On the one hand, the delivery to the attorney is a communication which the attorney is required to protect. (Rule 1.6) However, an attorney is not to unlawfully obstruct another party’s access to evidence. (Rule 3.4) How is this conflict resolved? The courts of Illinois do not appear to have directly addressed this.
Key strategies for generating profitable new clients By Byron G. Sabol Racial and Ethnic Minorities and the Law, February 2011 Clients do business with, and refer business to, lawyers they know, like, and trust. By focusing marketing efforts on the strategies outlined in this article, women lawyers will become better known and liked by clients.
Key strategies for generating profitable new clients By Byron G. Sabol Women and the Law, October 2010 Clients do business with, and refer business to, lawyers they know, like, and trust. By focusing marketing efforts on the strategies outlined in this article, women lawyers will become better known and liked by clients.
Your client is cheating on you with another lawyer: Why client loyalty is disappearing and why your marketing (or lack thereof) may be to blame. By Richard Davis Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, June 2010 A few things you should be doing to “market” to your current clients so they don’t wander.
Win or lose, the client may not always be right By William A. Price Administrative Law, May 2010 He may have been a fourth-century Roman historian, but Ammianus Marcellinus' views of lawyers and clients is still relevant today.
Problem clients By Michael J. Meehan Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, March 2010 It is easier to decline a problem client than to terminate the attorney-client relationship. By identifying these problem clients at the outset, you can be a happier lawyer and have a more productive practice.
Where have all the clients gone? By Donald E. Weihl Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, December 2009 Have your clients stopped calling? Is your daily mail just bills?
Just answer the question By Willis R. Tribler Bench and Bar, September 2009 The author suggests that you keep People v. Harris handy for use whenever a client wants to “tell my story in my own words” or shows a tendency to give rambling or overbroad answers.
Some things I learned along the way By James E. Buchmiller General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, September 2009 The author's list of things he's learned that books couldn't teach him.
Where to look for clients and business or employment opportunities By Lewis F. Matuszewich International and Immigration Law, June 2009 In February of 2007 the ISBA’s International and Immigration Law Section Council met at the offices of Illinois Global Partnership. The officers of IGP explained to the Section Council members the activity and background of the organization.  
Dealing with a difficult client By Ryan Bradley Young Lawyers Division, December 2008 The practice of law is difficult and challenging even while working with the best clients.
Difficult Conversations—Applying the principles from the best-selling book to the practice of law By Kim L. Kirn Women and the Law, October 2008 The practice of law is filled with difficult conversations: telling someone who has been severely injured that their case is worth less than they think; explaining child custody rules to a divorcing spouse; and explaining to the senior partner who hired you why you have decided to leave your law firm.
You want it when? By Donald E. Weihl Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, September 2008 Specific strategies that will permit breathing room without causing the client to feel the attorney is being unresponsive.
Do you want to know how you can enhance your relationship with your top-tier clients? Why not ask them? By John W. Olmstead Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, June 2008 As you well know, your top-tier business and other institutional clients often represent 20 percent of your clients and 80 percent of your business and fee revenue.
Making it rain By Jean A. Kenol Young Lawyers Division, June 2008 One of the most intimidating and daunting thoughts for any lawyer who decides to embark on a solo or small practice is wondering where the clients will come from.
Client communication should start at the beginning By Timothy J. Storm General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, May 2008 Communication lies at the heart of much of what attorneys do with, and for, clients.
Resolutions for 2008 By Mary A. Corrigan Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, April 2008 Although 2008 is already underway, it is not too late to implement some resolutions for improvement of your law practice.
Hello, young lawyers By Rory Weiler Family Law, October 2007 Experienced practitioners will agree that one of the most overlooked elements of the practice of law, and certainly one topic none of us heard much, if anything, about in law school is the art of client selection and management.
Trouble, with a capital “T” By Michael J. Rooney Real Estate Law, August 2007 There can be some serious pitfalls facing a lawyer who neither knows nor clarifies who the client is and what that client really wants to accomplish.
Who is my client and what are my responsibilities under a power of attorney? By Myles Jacobs and Robert Duffin Real Estate Law, April 2007 You represent Bill and Mary in a transaction selling to Jack.
E-mail etiquette By Maxine R. Weiss Young Lawyers Division, February 2007 In today’s world of technology, many of us have fallen into the habit of e-mailing with our clients and opposing counsels.
Practice Tip: Know your client before you meet—Intake forms fill need By Lisa Olivero General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, November 2006 Over time the author has developed a short form that she now presents to potential clients when they appear for their initial consultation and before their first meeting.
Practice Update: Who is your client? What document can you disclose By Bernard Wysocki General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, October 2006 From a practical standpoint, it is important when you see a potential third party involvement, to secure written retainer and defining your representation.
Exceptional client service in law firms: Tips for rewarding and recognizing employees By John W. Olmstead Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, December 2005 By regularly rewarding and recognizing your attorneys and staff when they exhibit positive client service behaviors, rather than only noticing and commenting when they do something wrong, you help motivate them to keep up the good work and internalize the behavior.