Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Government Lawyers

Beware the errata sheet! By Kevin Lovellette and Summer Hallaj Federal Civil Practice, June 2015 A hypothetical scenario that illustrates the type of situation in which a government lawyer may find himself or herself when an opposing party seeks to retrospectively alter the substance of a witness’ original deposition testimony.
Time to rethink absolute prosecutorial discretion? By Evan Bruno Government Lawyers, June 2015 Prosecutors should never lose sight of their sacred duty to do the right thing. This applies not only to prosecuting criminals, but also— perhaps even more so—deciding whether to prosecute in the first place.
When the term “shall” is directory: The Illinois Supreme Court reinforces the presumption that statutory language that issues a procedural command to a government official is directory, rather than mandatory By Barbara Goeben Government Lawyers, June 2015 In light of these decisions, a trial court litigator must consider prejudice when arguing about a procedural violation of a statute. Further, appellate attorneys should also consider this precedent in defending an alleged procedural violation by a governmental official.
Beware the errata sheet! By Kevin Lovellette and Summer Hallaj Government Lawyers, April 2015 A hypothetical scenario that illustrates the type of situation in which a government lawyer may find himself or herself when an opposing party seeks to retrospectively alter the substance of a witness’ original deposition testimony.
Committee on Government Lawyers co-sponsors “Human Trafficking and the Commercial Exploitation of Children” seminar By Eileen M. Geary Government Lawyers, April 2015 A summary of this popular program held in October 2014.
States take the lead on legal education reform By Daniel Thies Young Lawyers Division, December 2014 A look at the steps states have taken to address the problem of law school debt and the need to prepare lawyers to provide services to the public. 
Co-owner or creditor? That is the question when dividing a marital public pension By Hon. Mark J. Lopez Family Law, August 2014 The Circuit Court of Cook County - Domestic Relations Division recently determined in a post-decree order that members of a public pension can be ordered to execute a consent to QILDRO.
Appellate court raises its eyebrow at Chicago’s ordinance enforcement machine By Evan Bruno Government Lawyers, June 2014 A discussion of the recent case of Stone Street Partners, LLC v. The City of Chicago Department of Administrative Hearings.
But, we were on a break… By Kevin Lovellette and Summer Hallaj Government Lawyers, June 2014 There are only a few cases from Seventh Circuit courts examining the issue of whether an attorney may speak to a deponent during a break in a deposition. The courts appear split on this issue.
In-sites Government Lawyers, April 2014 News articles and parent conversations seem to discuss cyber-bullying more and more. This article provides numerous resources that are available online.
Legislative summary of the 98th General Assembly Government Lawyers, September 2013 A summary of Public Acts 98-001 through 98-300 that may be of interest to the government bar.
Apply for a public administrator or public guardian appointment By Tracy Douglas Trusts and Estates, June 2013 Public administrators and public guardians serve an important role in Illinois by helping with estate administration and protecting the interests of disabled adults.
Does the Savings Statute save the day? By Kevin Lovellette Government Lawyers, June 2013 In situations where the Illinois Savings Statute allows a plaintiff one year to re-file a cause of action, this time limit may not be tolled by a pending appeal.
Apply for a public administrator or public guardian appointment By Tracy Douglas Women and the Law, May 2013 Public administrators and public guardians serve an important role in Illinois by helping with estate administration and protecting the interests of disabled adults.
The new age of privacy: A surprising amount of personal information may already be available to prosecutors By Patrick T. Driscoll and Douglas N. Marsh Government Lawyers, March 2013 Thanks to the staggering amount of information your cell phone generates, collects, stores, and transmits, even when you aren’t using it, silence has never been more deafening.
Attorney General issues opinions By Lynn Patton Government Lawyers, October 2012 Recent opinions issued by the Illinois Attorney General.
Public service and repaying your loans: Once impractical, now a reality By Matthew S. Dionne Government Lawyers, June 2012 This article seeks to call attention to and explain the recent federal and Illinois legislation designed to encourage attorneys to stay or enter the public interest field.
Public service and repaying your loans: Once impractical, now a reality By Matthew S. Dionne Young Lawyers Division, April 2012 This article seeks to call attention to and explain the recent federal and Illinois legislation designed to encourage attorneys to stay or enter the public interest field.
Attorney General issues opinions By Lynn Patton Government Lawyers, March 2012 Recent opinions issued by the Illinois Attorney General.
Social Security benefits not so beneficial to widows receiving government pensions By Joanna M. Lekkas Women and the Law, March 2012 Many government employees may not realize that their social security benefits are reduced by two-thirds of their government pension.
Whatcha gonna do, whatcha gonna do when they come for you? By Thomas L. Ciecko Government Lawyers, March 2012 What to expect when the Executive Inspector General requests information from you.
All members of public bodies required to complete Attorney General’s Open Meetings Act training curriculum Government Lawyers, January 2012 Public body members serving in office on January 1, 2012, must complete the training by December 31, 2012. Persons who become members of public bodies after January 1, 2012, must complete the training curriculum within 90 days of assuming office.
Is information on privately-owned electronic devices subject to FOIA?—What Public Access Binding Opinion No. 11-006 means to you and your government clients By John Redlingshafer Government Lawyers, January 2012 Opinion 11-006 of the Illinois Attorney General’s Public Access Bureau firmly establishes that electronic communications, whether shared on publicly or privately-owned devices, can be considered “public records” and therefore, may be subject to FOIA.
Is information on privately-owned electronic devices subject to FOIA?—What Public Access Binding Opinion No. 11-006 means to you and your government clients By John Redlingshafer Local Government Law, December 2011 Opinion 11-006 of the Illinois Attorney General’s Public Access Bureau firmly establishes that electronic communications, whether shared on publicly or privately-owned devices, can be considered “public records” and therefore, may be subject to FOIA.
In-sites Government Lawyers, October 2011 Resources for practitioners interested in government transparency and efficiency.
Don’t fear the reaper By Kevin Lovellette and Mary Jane Adkins Government Lawyers, June 2011 As government attorneys, we should have the ability to speak with a Coroner to gather all the information necessary to properly defend or prosecute on behalf of the People.
Freedom of Information Act—Recent & proposed changes By Stephan Roth and Jeannie Romas-Dunn Government Lawyers, June 2011 A look at some of the more significant changes made to FOIA in the last legislative cycle.
Got spare time? Need a break from brief writing? Check out these legal blogs—and have fun browsing! By Sharon L. Eiseman Government Lawyers, March 2011 A listing of popular legal blogs.
Agency lawyers left out of Loan Repayment Assistance Program* By Marc Christopher Loro Administrative Law, January 2011 A look at the content and rules of the Public Interest Attorney Assistance Act.