Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Human Rights

Bill of Rights for the Homeless Act By Peter LaSorsa Human Rights, March 2014 The Bill of Rights for the Homeless Act, codified at 775 ILCS 45, provides seven specific rights to those “experiencing homelessness”
Human rights-related articles from Illinois law school journals in 2013 By Robert Heuer Human Rights, March 2014 A list of articles published in 2013 in Illinois law school journals relating to human rights issues in a broad range of legal topics.
Upcoming CLE program By Shannon M. Shepherd Human Rights, March 2014 Sign up now for this informative seminar that will take place later this week.
Does the Second Amendment present a human-rights issue? By Evan Bruno Human Rights, December 2013 There can be no doubt that the Second Amendment to the Bill of Rights is alive and well. But to what extent does the right to “keep and bear arms” constitute a “human right?”
Illinois Human Rights Commission decision summaries By Laura D. Mruk Labor and Employment Law, October 2013 Recent cases of interest to employment law practitioners.
A human rights fellowship, by students for students By Stephanie Macuiba and Amy Friederich International and Immigration Law, June 2013 The authors of this article have co-founded a fellowship at the SIU School of Law that encourages other law students to intern abroad in the field of human rights and provides the financial assistance to do so.
Illinois Human Rights Commission decision summaries By Laura D. Mruk Labor and Employment Law, March 2013 Recent cases of interest to labor & employment law practitioners.
Illinois Human Rights Commission decision summaries By Laura D. Mruk Human Rights, March 2013 Recent cases of interest to human rights law practitioners.
Legislation on driver’s licenses for illegal immigrants presents administrative challenges to the Secretary of State’s Office By Marc Christopher Loro Human Rights, March 2013 This article reviews Public Act 97-1157's provisions, explains the challenges, and offers some thoughts on how those challenges could be met.
The constitutionality of criminalizing cyberbullying By Lauren Roadman Human Rights, January 2013 The growing problems of bullying and cyberbullying are forcing the government, as well as local communities, to look at ways to help solve these problems.
The future is almost here? By Anna Fridman Women and the Law, December 2012 The future, at least in the sense of predicting your lifespan and your potential for developing certain diseases, might not be very far off according to leading researchers in the field of genetic testing. But how might this information be used? How might people’s behavior change with the knowledge of new information?
Illinois Human Rights Commission decision summaries By Laura D. Mruk Labor and Employment Law, December 2012 Recent cases of interest to labor & employment law practitioners.
The constitutionality of criminalizing cyberbullying By Lauren Roadman Alternative Dispute Resolution, November 2012 The growing problems of bullying and cyberbullying are forcing the government, as well as local communities, to look at ways to help solve these problems.
The truth, nothing but the truth—And the threat to the First Amendment By Steven Helle Human Rights, November 2012 Plaintiffs in several remarkable recent cases have claimed that free speech should be regulated not because it is false, but because it is true.
First District finds that the Cook County Commission on Human Rights does not have the authority to award punitive damages By Laura D. Mruk Labor and Employment Law, October 2012 Recently, in Jimmy Crittenden v. Cook County Commission on Human Rights, the First District found that under the Cook County Code of Ordinances, the Cook County Commission on Human Rights does not have the authority to award punitive damages. 
Is the use of facial recognition software an invasion of your privacy rights? By Peter LaSorsa Human Rights, October 2012 Individuals own their facial profile and at least in Illinois they are afforded some protections.
A new shield against governmental interference with religious entities By Fred J. Naffziger Human Rights, October 2012 In its most important religious freedom case in the past four decades, the Supreme Court recently handed attorneys defending religious institutions from governmental interference a significant shield.
Oyez! Oyez! Oyez! Supreme Court’s new term By Derrick Thompson Jr. Human Rights, October 2012 By all accounts, the U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 term is expected to create major headlines with several high profile cases involving human rights, civil rights and civil liberties.
Supreme Court in review: The Affordable Care Act cases By Derrick Thompson Jr. Human Rights, October 2012 In June, 2012, the Affordable Care Act was upheld in a 5-4 decision. The following is a brief synopsis of the issues before the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court’s answers to those issues.
A new world order: Harvard Professor John Ruggie’s final guiding principles on business and human rights By Michael G. Congiu Business Advice and Financial Planning, April 2012 The final U.N.'s Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights pose an enormously significant set of parameters upon corporations and signify a critical departure from the historical obligation of states to protect and promote the human rights. According to the Guiding Principles, companies now have human rights obligations that are commensurate and may even exceed the obligations of sovereign states.
An interview with State Representative Robyn Gabel on House Bill 1958 and the shackling of pregnant prisoners By Mary F. Petruchius Women and the Law, March 2012 An interview with Robyn Gabel, who sponsored a bill in the Illinois House of Representatives aimed to improve conditions for pregnant prisoners.
Immigration detainers violate human rights By Kelly Brackley Human Rights, December 2011 Why should immigrants be treated any differently from anyone else who is arrested—why are they denied due process?
It’s Game Over for proponents of videogame regulation By Steven Helle Human Rights, December 2011 Many courts have pointed out that no one has been able to establish anything more than a correlation—and not causation—between violence in videogames and real life. A look at the recently decided case of Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Assn.
Meet the members of the Human Rights Section Council Human Rights, December 2011 Get to know more about Human Rights Section Council members Michael Maslanka and Shannon Shepherd.
Meet the editors Human Rights, October 2011 Get to know the editors responsible for putting together the Human Rights newsletter.
Respecting religious freedom without sacrificing justice: The right to wear religious garb in court proceedings By Hon. Thomas More Donnelly Bench and Bar, October 2011 The free exercise of religion in this country deserves a delicate approach. While a trial judge has the ultimate responsibility to control the courtroom, the responsibility must be exercised reasonably and within constitutional bounds.
LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative By Mark E. Wojcik International and Immigration Law, September 2011 The National Immigrant Justice Center announced that it has changed the name of its LGBT-focused project from the “National Asylum Partnership on Sexual Minorities” to the “LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative.”
Analysis of order preliminarily enjoining Arizona S.B. 1070 By David W. Austin Human Rights, August 2011 S.B. 1070 has already generated a number of resolutions in both the Illinois House and Senate, as well as the Chicago City Council, all calling for its repeal.
The new Arizona immigration law mirrors existing federal law By Peter LaSorsa Human Rights, August 2011 The federal government estimated that Arizona had one of the fastest growing illegal immigrant populations in the country, increasing from 330,000 in 2000 to 560,000 by 2008.
Some comments from Arizona By Kathryn E. Eisenhart Human Rights, August 2011 Some thoughts about SB 1070 from author Kathryn Eisenhart.