Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Requests to Admit

Attention to detail—A shift in response requirements for requests to admit By Jay Schultz Bench and Bar, March 2013 In Oelze v. Score Sports Venture, the court determined that asserting a lack of information or knowledge via boilerplate responses to requests to admit will not suffice.
Practice tip: Attention to detail—A shift in response requirements for requests to admit By Jay Schultz Administrative Law, February 2013 In Oelze v. Score Sports Venture, the court determined that asserting a lack of information or knowledge via boilerplate responses to requests to admit will not suffice.
Practice tip: Attention to detail—A shift in response requirements for requests to admit By Jay Schultz General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, January 2013 In Oelze v. Score Sports Venture, the court determined that asserting a lack of information or knowledge via boilerplate responses to requests to admit will not suffice.
Application of discovery rules to requests to admit By Kevin Lovellette Government Lawyers, June 2012 One issue that has recently seen increased litigation is whether Requests to Admit are discovery devices subject to the requirements of discovery rules and orders of court.
Vision Point v. Haas: Breathing room For litigants on Requests to Admit By Steven G. Pietrick Civil Practice and Procedure, October 2007 On September 20, 2007, the Illinois Supreme Court issued its long awaited decision in Vision Point of Sale, Inc. v. Haas, providing what many in the legal community perceive as a merciful relaxation of the overly strict interpretation of Rule 216’s requirements and the near-draconian effects which can result.
Requests to Admit: Vision Point of Sale v. Haas By Michael J. Marovich Civil Practice and Procedure, December 2006 On November 29, 2006 the Illinois Supreme Court granted a petition for leave to appeal in the case of Vision Point of Sale, Inc. v. Haas, 366 Ill.App.3d 692, 852 N.E.2d 331 (1st Dist. 2006).
Playing by the rules has its advantages By Jamie L. Bas Young Lawyers Division, October 2006 If you go through your mail and find a document called a Request to Admit Facts, make sure you carefully read Illinois Supreme Court Rule 216, which governs this document.
Requests to admit By Jerold S. Solovy and Robert L. Byman Administrative Law, April 2005 Your opponent serves requests to admit to set you up for disaster. Admit and your adversary will use your admissions to get summary judgment or make her life easier, yours uncomfortable at trial.
Requests to admit By Jerold S. Solovy and Robert L. Byman Bench and Bar, March 2005 Your opponent serves requests to admit to set you up for disaster.
Effective uses of Supreme Court Rule 216 requests to admit By Albert E. Durkin Tort Law, December 2003 Requests for Admissions of Facts and Requests for Admission of Genuineness of Documents, a.k.a., "requests to admit," are an effective and often-overlooked discovery tool.
Requests to admit facts and for genuineness of documents By Jessica A. Bank Family Law, November 2001 Requests for Admissions of Fact and Genuineness of Documents are effective litigation tools for expediting and simplifying discovery, for compelling admission of incontrovertible facts, and for narrowing issues to be addressed at trial.
Use of Requests to Admit in summary suspension hearings By J. Brick Van Der Snick Traffic Laws and Courts, June 1999 This article will outline the impact and benefits of using the Request to Admit Facts in a summary suspension proceeding and will highlight the case law on this point.