Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Virtual Law Firms

Solo tech can beat the big firms By Peter LaSorsa Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, February 2013 In the past, only 1,000-lawyer firms could practice across the country where a physical presence was required. Today, technology has given solo attorneys the ability to easily practice anywhere they can take their laptop and have access to a high-speed Internet connection. If you have the legal ability, the gumption, and the desire, you can expand your practice past the local town or city where you currently reside.
On the road again: My (virtual) road to a (real) better life—Part 2 By Timothy J. Storm General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, July 2012 The second in this two-part series that looks at the costs and benefits of converting to a virtual law practice.
My (virtual) road to a (real) better life By Timothy J. Storm Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, March 2012 The author shares his reasons for transforming his practice, his concerns as he plans for the conversion, and his initial thoughts about how to proceed. 
My (virtual) road to a (real) better life By Timothy J. Storm General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, February 2012 Section Chair Timothy Storm shares his experiences in transforming his practice into a virtual law office.
Status report on my paperless office By Alan R. Press Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, September 2010 A paperless office may not be for everyone, but author Alan Press discusses how it has made his practice more efficient and more profitable.
The virtual practice: The what and why By R. Andrew Smith Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, October 2009 The virtual office concept has been around for some time; however, it has not typically been used in the context of practicing law.  
Using a home office and virtual workers: Our firm’s experience By Peter R. Olson Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, May 2008 What’s the worst decision the author has made related to his law firm since its founding? Paying rent for a Chicago Loop office he didn’t need and hardly ever used.
Now you don’t see it—Now you do By Peter Mierzwa Family Law, October 2006 This title describes the conundrum in which we attorneys find ourselves as we move further toward an electronic practice.