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Environmental LawThe newsletter of the ISBA’s Section on Environmental Law

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Newsletter articles from 2014

Battles over hydraulic fracturing moving to the hinterland By William J. Anaya January 2014 The recent case of Robinson Township, et al. v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, et al. is significant for a variety of reasons.
Court limits application of Bona Fide Prospective Purchaser defense By Raymond T. Reott March 2014 A discussion of the ramifications of the recent Voggenthaler v. Maryland Square LLC case.
Illinois court says insurer cannot escape duty to defend hog odor lawsuit under “pollution exclusion” in umbrella policy By Kristine Tidgren January 2014 In what could broaden an insurer’s duty to defend Illinois livestock producers in odor lawsuits, an Illinois appeals court has rejected an insurer’s denial of coverage to hog confinement operators pursuant to a standard “pollution exclusion” provision in an umbrella liability policy
Owner of vacant property liable for CERCLA cleanup By Raymond T. Reott March 2014 The recent California decision in City of Banning v. Dureau illustrates the danger faced by a property owner who does not monitor and control activities on his vacant properties. 
Recent environmental decisions: Federal cases By Kyle P. Carlson, Alison Hayden Kekrer, and Emily N. Masalski June 2014 Recent cases of interest to environmental law practitioners.
Terminating a corporation or LLC By John D. Gutzke March 2014 An overview of the steps required to close a business.
USEPA wins cross state air transport pollution case By Raymond T. Reott June 2014 In a 6-2 vote, the United States Supreme Court has reversed the decision of the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals on an important Clean Air Act case.
What is so great about a “No Further Remediation” letter anyway? By Matthew E. Cohn January 2014 When deciding whether to buy, sell, hold, investigate, remediate, manage, or do anything else with or to your contaminated properties, the most important things to have are good data, good science, good counsel, good motives, and a healthy understanding of your tolerance of risk.