Practice Tools

Transitioning to a Virtual Office - Practice Resource Center

Articles

  • Anna P. Krolikowska
    General Practice, Solo & Small Firm, July 2016

    Have you checked out the ISBA Mutual’s lawyers’ space at 20 S. Clark St., on the eighth floor? There you can find a quiet café where you can help yourself to a cup of coffee or tea, enjoy a great view, and take advantage of free Wi-Fi. Also available are micro-offices where you can make private calls.

  • Michael Brennan
    Standing Committee on Legal Technology, May 2016

    Operating a pure VLO is not for every practitioner, but incorporating some virtual characteristics into an existing brick and mortar firm can create new opportunities for client interaction and increased growth.

  • Tracy A. Brammeier
    YLDNews, April 2016

    what if you spill coffee all over your computer, or a flood destroys the power cables, frying your hardware, and you haven’t backed up to your external hard drive in over a week? What if you need quick access to your files from another state, or need to contact your office while out of the country without racking up international charges?

  • Illinois Bar Journal, October 2015

    Michael Brennan lives in Grayslake but practices full time in the cloud.

  • Dan Breen
    The Bottom Line, April 2014

    The author has compiled a handy list of a few options to consider when looking for out-of-office help.

  • Peter LaSorsa
    Standing Committee on Legal Technology, February 2013

    In the past, only 1,000-lawyer firms could practice across the country where a physical presence was required. Today, technology has given solo attorneys the ability to easily practice anywhere they can take their laptop and have access to a high-speed Internet connection. If you have the legal ability, the gumption, and the desire, you can expand your practice past the local town or city where you currently reside.

  • Timothy J. Storm
    General Practice, Solo & Small Firm, July 2012

    The second in this two-part series that looks at the costs and benefits of converting to a virtual law practice.

  • Maria Kantzavelos
    Illinois Bar Journal, April 2012

    Wouldn't it be great to access case files from your laptop or store essential documents where no disaster can reach them? You can, and here's how.

  • Timothy J. Storm
    Standing Committee on Legal Technology, March 2012

    The author shares his reasons for transforming his practice, his concerns as he plans for the conversion, and his initial thoughts about how to proceed. 

  • Peter R. Olson
    Illinois Bar Journal, October 2011

    Is it time to move your practice online? Internet-based legal software innovations offer practitioners ways to cut costs while expanding their potential client base.

  • Alan R. Press
    Standing Committee on Legal Technology, September 2010

    A paperless office may not be for everyone, but author Alan Press discusses how it has made his practice more efficient and more profitable.

  • Helen W. Gunnarsson
    Illinois Bar Journal, August 2010

    The keynote speaker at October's ISBA Solo and Small Firm Conference will tell participants how to thrive in a tough economy and changing practice landscape.

  • Helen W. Gunnarsson
    Illinois Bar Journal, December 2009

    With the right technology, you can be as productive when you're traveling as you are in the office.

  • R. Andrew Smith
    The Bottom Line, October 2009

    The virtual office concept has been around for some time; however, it has not typically been used in the context of practicing law.  

  • Peter R. Olson
    The Bottom Line, May 2008

    What’s the worst decision the author has made related to his law firm since its founding? Paying rent for a Chicago Loop office he didn’t need and hardly ever used.

  • Peter Mierzwa
    Family Law, October 2006

    This title describes the conundrum in which we attorneys find ourselves as we move further toward an electronic practice.


Have a suggestion for a practice resource? Please email Mark Mathewson.

These resources are presented as educational resources for for ISBA members. They should not be relied upon as a substitute for individual legal research, and the ISBA does not warrant the accuracy of the information that appears in them.