Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Career Advice

What can I be with a J.D.? By Heather M. Fritsch Young Lawyers Division, August 2007 In our last issue, we got to know Michele Jochner, Judicial Law Clerk for the Illinois Supreme Court. This issue, we will focus on Nancy Tikalsky, Assistant Attorney General.
What can I be with a J.D.? Young Lawyers Division, June 2007 In our last issue, we got to know Michael Haas, the Senior Contract and Grant Officer in the Office of Sponsored Research at Northwestern University. This issue, we will focus on Michele Jochner, Judicial Law Clerk for the Illinois Supreme Court.
The second top 10 things they did not teach me in law school By Dennis A. Norden Business Advice and Financial Planning, May 2007 A list of 10 things the author has learned on the job.
Surviving (and thriving) as a young attorney By Amanda C. Jones Women and the Law, May 2007 According to the ABA Commission on Women in the Profession, in 2006, women comprised approximately 30 percent of the profession. In private practice, women accounted for approximately 47 percent of summer associates, 44 percent of associates, and only 17 percent of partners.
What can I be with a J.D.? By Heather M. Fritsch Young Lawyers Division, April 2007 In the last issue of this newsletter, we focused on Paul Miller and the position of Assistant General Counsel in the Office of Governor Rod Blagojevich.
What can I be with a J.D.? By Heather M. Fritsch Young Lawyers Division, February 2007 In the last issue, we focused on practicing law as an Attorney with the Office of the State’s Attorneys Appellate Prosecutor’s Office and spoke with Martin P. Moltz, the Deputy Director of the Second District Office.
What can I be with a J.D.? By Heather M. Fritsch Young Lawyers Division, December 2006 In the last issue, we focused on starting a solo practice and got to know YLD Council Member, Gregg Garofalo of Gregg A. Garofalo, P.C.
Salary negotiations for the small firm associate By Joe Giamanco General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, November 2006 For most of us who read this newsletter, the concept of obtaining a six-figure salary straight out of law school was nothing but a dream; yet, for those friends of ours who chose the path of the 100+ attorney law firms it was a reality.
“Legalese” rhymes with “fees” By Paulette Gray Family Law, October 2006 The parties to a divorce reserved the issue of the division of personal property and a judgment of dissolution of marriage was entered.
What can I be with a J.D.? By Heather M. Fritsch Young Lawyers Division, October 2006 In our last issue, we got to know Young Lawyers Division Council Member Tarek Fadel and how he started his own law-related business, AdaptiBar.
What can I be with a J.D.? By Heather M. Fritsch Young Lawyers Division, June 2006 We’ve all heard about books such as What Color Is My Parachute? and other books that help individuals figure out what they want to do with their lives.
My first year as the first associate By Peter R. Olson Young Lawyers Division, April 2004 As a 2002 law school graduate, I recently faced the dilemma presented to many young attorneys before me: where should I enter this diverse career spectrum otherwise known as the legal profession?
Marshall, Greaney, Ireland, Spina, Cowin, Sosman & Cordy By Matt Maloney General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, February 2004 What do these names mean? Is this the name of a boutique firm in Chicago or a large firm downstate? These names meant nothing to me until I read the opinion of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts filed on November 18, 2003 in Goodridge, et.al. v Department of Public Health, et.al.
Keeping things simple By Michael H. Erde Business Advice and Financial Planning, February 2001 I just read an article in a business publication quoting a person who thought that Fannie Mae was a funny name for a mortgage company.
Top 10 tips for the new general practitioner By Michael A. Hall General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, March 1999 Those of us from general practice firms have a distinct advantage over our colleagues who concentrate in one or two areas of the law; namely, they need us more often than we need them