Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Civility

“Strive mightily”: Some thoughts on civility and the Illinois bar By David W. Inlander and Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2013 It is time for our profession to return to being held out as an admirable model to follow, rather than one to ridicule.
Don’t! By Hon. Michael B. Hyman Government Lawyers, October 2012 Author and Judge Michael Hyman provides his list of DOs and DONTs that apply equally to proceedings in court and everyday life at the office.
Don’t! By Hon. Michael B. Hyman Bench and Bar, September 2012 Author and Judge Michael Hyman provides his list of DOs and DONTs that apply equally to proceedings in court and everyday life at the office.
The best compliment I ever received By Heather Pfeffer Young Lawyers Division, August 2012 The author reminds that being a good litigator and being a nice person are not mutually exclusive.
Can’t we all play nice? By Tiffany Alexander Family Law, April 2012 Just like a college basketball team can play a clean game without fouling, it is possible to adequately represent a client without resorting to unprofessional tactics against your opponent.
Is nice a four-letter word? By Annemarie E. Kill Women and the Law, May 2010 Does being considered a nice person mean you can't also be a successful, effective attorney?
Win with civility By Sandra Blake Bench and Bar, October 2009 In 2005, the Illinois Supreme Court established the Illinois Commission on Professionalism, making Illinois one of only 14 states that have a formal body working to promote professionalism and civility.
Win with civility By Sandra Blake Women and the Law, September 2009 In 2005, the Illinois Supreme Court established the Illinois Commission on Professionalism, making Illinois one of only 14 states that have a formal body working to promote professionalism and civility.
Civility and religious sensitivity By Andrea M. Schleifer Bench and Bar, April 2009 Almost 75 years ago, the Decalogue Society of Lawyers was created to among other things, confront anti-Semitism and discrimination encountered by Jewish attorneys in the Courts. Unfortunately, at that time, many judges would knowingly schedule trials on Jewish holidays without compunction. That rarely happens today, when most judges respect the religious requirements of litigants and lawyers.
Whose side are you on? By Jamie L. Bas Young Lawyers Division, December 2008 Like everyone, I had an image of what I thought my life would be like when I became a lawyer.
Who should speak on civility in civil litigation? By Kimball R. Anderson Civil Practice and Procedure, June 2008 In September 2005, the Supreme Court of Illinois announced two new programs aimed at promoting lawyer civility.
The taming of the rude By Michael B. Hyman Bench and Bar, July 2006 Lack of civility concerns every judge and lawyer who takes pride in our profession.
Sage advice By Judge William J. Bauer Bench and Bar, April 2006 The pressures of large caseloads, the duties of running the courtroom day-to-day and all the other juggling of priorities that goes into the judicial business sometimes causes us to lose patience, to be less than kind.
Civility in daily life: Give ‘em the finger By Michael W. Raridon Racial and Ethnic Minorities and the Law, December 2003 I was driving back to my office, loudly grooving on my Three Dog Night's Greatest Hits CD, when this guy in a pickup truck gave me the finger.
Finding higher ground in the law By Paula A. Franzese General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, January 1999 Mindful of the significant malaise felt by many practitioners, the following principles offer guidance and hope for the restoration of our craft and ourselves.