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Criminal JusticeThe newsletter of the ISBA’s Section on Criminal Justice

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Newsletter articles from 2012

Case note By Geraldine D’Souza December 2012 A summary of The People of the State of Illinois v. Terrell D. Geiger.
Case note By Mark Kevin Wykoff November 2012 In People v. McKinney, Defendant pled guilty to burglary based on the erroneous advice of counsel. The issue before the appellate court was whether Defendant was entitled to withdraw his plea and pursue his request for admission to the program.
Case note By Mark Kevin Wykoff Sr. August 2012 A summary of The People ex rel. James W. Glasgow, Petitioner, v. Gerald R. Kinney, Judge, Respondent.
Case notes By Andrea Mesko, Mark Kevin Wykoff Sr., Jesus Ricardo Rivera, David B. Franks, and James Stern March 2012 Recent cases of interest to criminal law practitioners.
Editor’s note By Hon. Gregory Paul Vazquez December 2012 An introduction to the issue from Judge Greg Vazquez, editor of the Criminal Justice newsletter.
Editor’s note By Hon. Gregory Paul Vazquez February 2012 An introduction to the issue from Judge Greg Vazquez.
HOUSE BILLS—Criminal, Juvenile & Traffic By Steve Baker December 2012 Recent legislation of interest to criminal law practitioners.
HOUSE BILLS—Criminal, Juvenile & Traffic By Steve Baker February 2012 Recent cases of interest to criminal law practitioners.
Objects under the rearview mirror may be more of a material obstruction than they appear By Rob Shumaker November 2012 Objects dangling from the rearview mirror may justify a traffic stop but only if they constitute a material obstruction. The author addresses the case law on this issue and offers practice tips to determine whether an object materially obstructs a driver’s view of the road.
People v. Kladis and the Illinois Supreme Court’s treatment of evidence spoliation by law enforcement By Mark T. Vazquez August 2012 Evidence spoliation stands as a significant obstacle to the truth-seeking function of the courts. The Kladis opinion addressed these concerns and recognizes that trial judges should have significant freedom to impose sanctions to deter such spoliation when it occurs.