Publications

Section Newsletter Articles From James Bumgarner

Do a domain By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, September 2004 In the Standing Committee on Legal Technology newsletter, June 2004, Vol. 11. No.4, the article "How to Design a Simple Education-Based Web Site for an Individual Attorney" explains what a good law office Web page and its links should contain.
Have you joined RISSNET? By James Bumgarner Human Rights, September 2003 If you are presently a member of VGTOF, Capps, TIA, or TIDISDM, you are also a member of RISSNET.
Have you joined RISSNET? By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, August 2003 If you are presently a member of VGTOF, Capps, TIA, or TIDISDM, you are also a member of RISSNET. What's good about this? If you are stopped by law enforcement, with a little bit of luck, you could be reported as a terrorist.
Worthy of note By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, April 2003 Volunteer your PC: Would you like to help the effort to analyze anthrax and cancer cells? To identify chemical molecules that could block the smallpox virus?
Trailing Cybercrime By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, May 2002 Hastened by the September 11th attack on the United States, we now have in place a procedure for global cooperation in the search for crimes being planned, having been committed, and in commission.
Search better By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, December 2001 Long ago, for searching the Internet, there was Gopher (http://www.infospace.com/info.gopher/), and Yahoo (http://www.yahoo.com/).
Carnivore is not a meat-eating animal By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, January 2001 "Carnivore" is Internet-surveillance software, a politically correct term for the FBI's electronic eavesdropping system.
To share or not to share By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, October 2000 Would you like to share the files and programs on your computer with millions of other computers? J
Can your computer count past 1999? By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, November 1999 If your computer and software are programmed to assume that all year dates begin with "19," you should see what you can do to fix them before the year 2000; or, before that, if your projected calendars, amortizations, or due dates extend more than three years from today.
Can your computer count past 1999? By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, April 1999 If your computer and software are programmed to assume that all year dates begin with "19," you should see what you can do to fix them before the year 2000; or before that, if your projected calendars, amortizations, or due dates extend more than two years from today.

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