Publications

Section Newsletter Articles From Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr.

What constitutes being a “public body” subject to the provisions of FOIA – Better Government Association v. Illinois High School Association, et al. By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Government Lawyers, December 2017 The Illinois Supreme Court, in Better Government Association v. Illinois High School Association, et al., determined that the Illinois High School Association was not a “public body” as defined by the Freedom of Information Act
What constitutes being a “public body” subject to the provisions of FOIA – Better Government Association v. Illinois High School Association, et al. By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Education Law, December 2017 The Illinois Supreme Court, in Better Government Association v. Illinois High School Association, et al., determined that the Illinois High School Association was not a “public body” as defined by the Freedom of Information Act
The power of an Inspector General to seek information from a separately elected county official— Blanchard v. Berrios By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Local Government Law, March 2017 in Blanchard v. Berrios, the Illinois Supreme Court determined that the Cook County Inspector General had the authority to seek information and to issue subpoenas to the separately elected Cook County Assessor.
What may the Concealed Carry License Review Board properly consider when granting or denying a permit? By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Government Lawyers, March 2017 The ruling in Perez v. The Illinois Concealed Carry Licensing Review Bd. provides direction as to what information may be considered when approving or denying a conceal carry permit application.
Smoke N Stuff v. City of Chicago: Does the One-Act, One-Crime Rule Apply to Proceedings at Municipal Administrative Hearings? By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Government Lawyers, January 2016 Smoke N Stuff v. City of Chicago serves as a reminder that license revocation is a possible sanction even when someone’s business is at stake.
Stone Street Partners v. City of Chicago Department of Administrative Hearings—Non-lawyers cannot represent corporations at administrative hearings By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. (Ret.) Government Lawyers, April 2015 The Appellate Court of Illinois, in Stone Street Partners, LLC v. City of Chicago Dept. of Administrative Hearings, reviewed the issues of notice to corporations of municipal code violations and the propriety of non-lawyers appearing on behalf of a corporation at a municipal administrative hearing.
Who can waive a FOIA exemption from disclosure—A mayor or police superintendent? By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Government Lawyers, January 2014 A summary of the recent case of Michael Dumke v. City of Chicago.
The new age of privacy: A surprising amount of personal information may already be available to prosecutors By Patrick T. Driscoll and Douglas N. Marsh Government Lawyers, March 2013 Thanks to the staggering amount of information your cell phone generates, collects, stores, and transmits, even when you aren’t using it, silence has never been more deafening.
New MCLE rule changes effective September 27, 2011 By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Julie Busch Government Lawyers, January 2012 A summary of the significant changes to the MCLE rules that apply to all attorneys.
Someone you should know: Sam Brooks, Deputy Managing Counsel with the USPS By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Caitlyn Jones Government Lawyers, December 2010 As someone who has devoted his career to government work and public service, Sam Brooks is someone you should know.
Question: How is the legal profession responding to the challenges of the recession? Answer: Alternative billing practices By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Patricia M. Fallon Government Lawyers, April 2010 A look at how the current economy is affecting billing practices.
Question: How is the legal profession responding to the challenges of the recession? Answer: Alternative billing practices By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Patricia M. Fallon Federal Civil Practice, March 2010 A look at how the current economy is affecting billing practices.
Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 129 S.Ct. 1937, 173 L. Ed. 2d 868 (May 18, 2009) By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Patricia M. Fallon Federal Civil Practice, September 2009 In May, a closely divided Supreme Court ruled that former Attorney General John Ashcroft and FBI Director Robert Mueller could not be held liable for the actions of subordinates after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
Joinder of an essential party under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 19 By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. Federal Civil Practice, September 2009 An overview of the case of Carl Askew v. Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, and Bernardo Lopez.
Letter from the Chair By Patrick T. Driscoll Federal Civil Practice, September 2008 The Federal Civil Practice Section Council had a very successful year in 2007-2008. The Section Council presented two CLE programs which were well attended and favorably received.
Affirmative defenses in federal court: What every practitioner should know By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Patricia M. Fallon Federal Civil Practice, June 2008 Rule 8 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (“FRCP”) governs the assertion of affirmative defenses in civil cases filed in federal court and is defined:
E-Mail and the Attorney-Client Privilege: In re County of Erie By Patrick T. Driscoll, Jr. and Patricia M. Fallon Government Lawyers, September 2007 In re County of Erie, 473 F.3d 413 (2d Cir. 2007), involved a class action lawsuit brought by a group of arrested individuals who alleged they were subjected to unconstitutional strip searches.

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