Articles From Sharon L. Eiseman

The Illinois Supreme Court says: “Ryan gets nothing.” Illinois taxpayers under no obligation to fund his retirement By Sharon L. Eiseman Government Lawyers, June 2010 It is irrelevant to the Court that the felonies for which Ryan was convicted were not committed during his service as Lieutenant Governor or as an Illinois legislator.
How far have we come in eradicating discrimination in our profession and what is the blueprint for the future? By Sharon L. Eiseman Racial and Ethnic Minorities and the Law, November 2009 Like any occupation, the legal profession has not been immune from workplace problems like discrimination, hostile environment, harassment and retaliation
‘Sunshine on my shoulders makes me happy’—Sunshine on my subpoenas does not: a case summary of Better Government Association v. Blagojevich By Sharon L. Eiseman Government Lawyers, April 2009 Illinois courts must enforce the legislative policy that “the sunshine of public scrutiny is the best antidote to public corruption[.]”
‘Women Everywhere’ project launches its 10th year of community service, court visits for high school girls By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, March 2009 In 2009, the Women Everywhere: Partners in Service Project (“WE”) will be celebrating its first decade by again doing what it has done so well since its founding in 1999: sending women and men volunteer attorneys and legal support staff into community service agencies on a specified day to provide legal and labor-intensive assistance to agency staff.
New law offers better protection for victims of violence (but we’re not where we need to be quite yet) By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, December 2008 Recently, our State Legislature passed and the Governor signed into law as PA095-0999 an amendment to the 2006 Safe Homes Act (“SHA”).
Last letter from the Chair: And a wonderful time was had by all in Carbondale, Illinois! By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, June 2008 Sadly but inevitably, this is my final Chair’s column for the 2007-08 term.
If you build your own corner office they will come! By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, March 2008 This article is about a recent interview the author conducted and is intended as a preview of a future roundtable discussion/exploration about women attorneys making the tough career choices—mostly to ‘go it on their own.’
Letter from the Chair: Is it midyear already? By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, January 2008 Being an observant but not deeply religious person, I sometimes feel uncomfortable when a friend or stranger says to me: “Have a blessed day.”
Senators introduce bill in Congress to combat violence against girls and women on a global level By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, January 2008 On November 1, 2007, Senators Joseph Biden (D-DE) and Richard Lugar (R-IN) introduced in the Senate the International Violence Against Women Act, closely modeled on the VAWA enacted by Congress in 1994 and recently re-authorized.
Welcome to a new year By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, November 2007 It has been my privilege to serve as a member and supporting officer of the Women and the Law Standing Committee for several years; this bar year, the privilege of service has extended to my chairing of the Committee.
Special needs of girls and women in prison: What can we do? By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, October 2006 During its 2005-06 term, the Women and the Law Committee welcomed special guest speaker Lori Levin, Executive Director of the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, to one of our meetings.
Legislative report By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, September 2005 Despite the huge number of bills that died in session during this recent term, a great number of ones introduced made it to the Governor's desk and were signed into law.
High-tech hits home: Can local government officials use electronic communication tools without violating the sunshine laws? By Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. & Sharon L. Eiseman Administrative Law, July 2003 It is the public policy of this State that public bodies exist to aid in the conduct of the people's business and that the people have a right to be informed as to the conduct of their business
High-tech hits home: Can local government officials use electronic communication tools without violating the sunshine laws?* By Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. & Sharon L. Eiseman Government Lawyers, May 2003 It is the public policy of this State that public bodies exist to aid in the conduct of the people's business and that the people have a right to be informed as to the conduct of their business.
High-tech hits home: Can local government officials use electronic communication tools without violating the sunshine laws? By Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. & Sharon L. Eiseman Local Government Law, February 2003 It is the public policy of this State that public bodies exist to aid in the conduct of the people's business and that the people have a right to be informed as to the conduct of their business.
Two awards bestowed upon the Women Everywhere Service Project By Sharon L. Eiseman Women and the Law, December 2001 Two bar associations have presented awards to the Women Everywhere: Partners in Service Project.
Seventh Circuit deals a blow to affirmative action set-asides for women and minorities in Illinois By Sharon L. Eiseman & Stephen P. Ellenbecker Women and the Law, October 2001 The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently dealt a set-back for set-aside programs implemented by Cook County, Illinois. Builders' Assn. of Greater Chicago v. County of Cook, F. Supp. 2d 1087 (N.D. Ill. 2000), aff'd, 256 F.3d 642 (7th Cir. 2001), involved a Cook County ordinance that required a minimum of 30 percent of the dollar value of public works contracts awarded by the county to go to minority-owned business enterprises (MBE) and at least 10 percent of the value of such contracts to be awarded to women-owned business enterprises (WBE.)
A guide to annexations and annexation procedures By Sharon L. Eiseman Local Government Law, December 1999 Division 1 of Article 7 of the Illinois Municipal Code (65 ILCS 5/7-1-1, et seq.) provides for several means of annexing property to a municipality. The following outline is intended as a guide for municipal staff and officials.

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