Articles From David W. Inlander

Bench & Bar Section Council year in review 2018-19: Reflections from the chair By David W. Inlander Bench and Bar, June 2019 A note from the outgoing chair, David W. Inlander.
Crisis? National emergency? For Illinois lawyers, it’s time to address a serious issue By David W. Inlander Bench and Bar, March 2019 A note from the chair, David W. Inlander.
Bench & Bar addresses attacks on the rule of law By David W. Inlander Bench and Bar, January 2019 A note from the chair of the Bench & Bar Section Council, David W. Inlander.
Judicial temperament: Concerns and questions By David W. Inlander Bench and Bar, December 2018 As a section council particularly focused on the subject of civility, it is critical to take questions of judicial temperament seriously.
Chair’s column: Truth and the law By David W. Inlander Bench and Bar, September 2018 As responsible practicing lawyers and judges, we must speak out to defend our judicial system.
Chair’s column: We could be heroes By David W. Inlander Bench and Bar, July 2018 A message from the Bench & Bar Section Council's chair, David W. Inlander.
Upholding or striking consumer mandatory arbitration clauses: What is the current trend? By David W. Inlander & Deborah Jo Soehlig Alternative Dispute Resolution, May 2018 Recent cases have addressed situations that call into play the issues raised by mandatory arbitration clauses and class action waivers in form agreements.
Upholding or striking consumer mandatory arbitration clauses—What is the current trend? By David W. Inlander & Deborah Jo Soehlig Bench and Bar, February 2018 Recent cases, and the revocation of the CFPB rules limiting arbitration provisions in consumer contracts, continue the growing trend to remove many types of cases from the traditional litigation arena, when arbitration was contracted for between the parties.
Pennsylvania judge takes a bold stand against unprofessional conduct By David W. Inlander & Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Civil Practice and Procedure, October 2015 Recently Judge Paul Panepinto, presiding over a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, medical malpractice action, imposed a sanction of almost $1 million upon an attorney due to her expert witness’ violation of an agreed order in limine. Could such a sanction be imposed in Illinois to promote attorney professionalism?
Pennsylvania judge takes a bold stand against unprofessional conduct By David W. Inlander & Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, September 2015 Recently Judge Paul Panepinto, presiding over a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, medical malpractice action, imposed a sanction of almost $1 million upon an attorney due to her expert witness’ violation of an agreed order in limine. Could such a sanction be imposed in Illinois to promote attorney professionalism?
Lawyer shopping as a sword: It’s time to stop this abuse By David W. Inlander & Deborah Jo Soehlig Bench and Bar, October 2014 What should a lawyer and judge do when confronted with a litigant who has interviewed many attorneys in a field, and now attempts to disqualify all those he does not retain from representing his opponent?
“Strive mightily”: Some thoughts on civility and the Illinois bar By David W. Inlander & Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2013 It is time for our profession to return to being held out as an admirable model to follow, rather than one to ridicule.
Deposition advocacy: A step too far? By David W. Inlander & Deborah Jo Soehlig Bench and Bar, May 2012 If a judge is presented with a request for the admission of a discovery deposition in which conduct occurred which would be prohibited at trial, such as taking a break while a question was pending, or lengthy breaks with counsel followed by variances in testimony, what is the judge to do?
When can a judge judge whether a judge can judge? In Re The Estate of Mary Ann Wilson, 238 Ill.2d 519 (2010) By David W. Inlander & Deborah Jo Soehlig Bench and Bar, June 2011 At issue in Estate of Wilson was whether the judge against whom the petition for substitution was filed was entitled to decide whether the petition was facially sufficient to require a hearing.
Perception vs. reality: Money in judicial elections By David W. Inlander & Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, March 2011 A contrast between the approaches taken by Illinois and New York to reduce the public's perception of the role money plays in influencing judicial elections.

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