Publications

Section Newsletter Articles From Ronald D. Menna, Jr.

Appellate court clarifies how to properly complete a summons By Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Civil Practice and Procedure, December 2015 Recently, in Arch Bay Holdings, LLC-Series 2010B v. Perez, the Appellate Court set another trap for the unwary plaintiff, holding that service of summons is ineffective where a defendant’s name is not listed on the face of the summons, even though her name is listed on the attachment directing that she be served.
Pennsylvania judge takes a bold stand against unprofessional conduct By David W. Inlander and Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Civil Practice and Procedure, October 2015 Recently Judge Paul Panepinto, presiding over a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, medical malpractice action, imposed a sanction of almost $1 million upon an attorney due to her expert witness’ violation of an agreed order in limine. Could such a sanction be imposed in Illinois to promote attorney professionalism?
Pennsylvania judge takes a bold stand against unprofessional conduct By David W. Inlander and Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, September 2015 Recently Judge Paul Panepinto, presiding over a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, medical malpractice action, imposed a sanction of almost $1 million upon an attorney due to her expert witness’ violation of an agreed order in limine. Could such a sanction be imposed in Illinois to promote attorney professionalism?
First District requires two years of continuous employment to enforce employee covenants not to compete: Fifield v. Premier Dealer Services, Inc., 2013 IL App (1st) 120327 By Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Civil Practice and Procedure, August 2013 Fifield v. Premier Dealer Services, Inc. is one of the first published decisions on the enforcement of employment non-competition clauses following the Supreme Court’s decision in Reliable Fire Equipment Co. v. Arredondo on December 1, 2011.
“Strive mightily”: Some thoughts on civility and the Illinois bar By David W. Inlander and Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2013 It is time for our profession to return to being held out as an admirable model to follow, rather than one to ridicule.
Perception vs. reality: Money in judicial elections By David W. Inlander and Ronald D. Menna, Jr. Bench and Bar, March 2011 A contrast between the approaches taken by Illinois and New York to reduce the public's perception of the role money plays in influencing judicial elections.

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