Publications

Section Newsletter Articles From John Redlingshafer

Does your park provide enough notice to you of the intended users? By John Redlingshafer Local Government Law, October 2014 Do you have a park district as a client? How about a municipality or school district that allows the public to use its playground equipment? If the answer is “yes” to either of these questions, be sure you and your clients are aware of Bowman v. the Chicago Park District.
Two new appellate cases further interpreting Illinois’ Freedom of Information Act By John Redlingshafer Local Government Law, April 2014 Both cases can have an impact on your local government practice: The first discusses what constitutes a “prevailing party” under FOIA, while the second revisits the issue as to whether a public body has to create a record in order to respond to a request.
More case law on FOIA’s unduly burdensome exemption: Shehadeh v. Madigan By John Redlingshafer Local Government Law, February 2014 Shehadeh v. Madigan is a sound reminder to those attorneys who represent or otherwise assist public bodies in responding to FOIA requests.
Can public bodies claim records are “Outside the scope” of a FOIA request? By John Redlingshafer Local Government Law, June 2012 A discussion of the Attorney General’s Public Access Counselor's binding opinion 12-009, which makes clear that “a public body is not authorized to redact information from responsive records which it considers to be ‘outside the scope’ of the FOIA request.”
Is information on privately-owned electronic devices subject to FOIA?—What Public Access Binding Opinion No. 11-006 means to you and your government clients By John Redlingshafer Government Lawyers, January 2012 Opinion 11-006 of the Illinois Attorney General’s Public Access Bureau firmly establishes that electronic communications, whether shared on publicly or privately-owned devices, can be considered “public records” and therefore, may be subject to FOIA.
Is information on privately-owned electronic devices subject to FOIA?—What Public Access Binding Opinion No. 11-006 means to you and your government clients By John Redlingshafer Local Government Law, December 2011 Opinion 11-006 of the Illinois Attorney General’s Public Access Bureau firmly establishes that electronic communications, whether shared on publicly or privately-owned devices, can be considered “public records” and therefore, may be subject to FOIA.

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