Articles From Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr.

Mental health review By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Mental Health Law, July 2019 Stress, anxiety, depression, and grief are common problems that can lead to serious health, career, and relationship problems, especially for lawyers.
Help is on the way By E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2019 A look at Judge John Pavich's life and unique path from CIA officer to judge.
When greenbacks were the rule of law By E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, June 2018 Judge Brockton Lockwood helped root out corruption in the Chicago courts while assigned to Cook County many years ago.
The thousand-foot rule By E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, February 2018 The Illinois Supreme Court recently issued a seminal ruling examining the constitutionality of the Illinois statute addressing the crime of unlawful use of weapons within 1,000 feet of a public park.
More will come! By E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, March 2017 There are certain laws, rules, conventions and practices that most lawyers are aware of and follow - sometimes referred to as “Hornbook Law.” Courts normally do not look at these established tenets of the law. However, when they do all bets may be off.
Video testimony: One-way, two-way, Skype, closed circuit: Let me count the ways…. By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, November 2016 This article is the result of a New Mexico Supreme Court case involving the use of Skype in a criminal case. It will present a brief history of the use of video in criminal proceedings in Illinois and other states.
The many faces of e-filing By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2016 An update on the status of electronic filing of papers in Illinois courts.
Justice on the move By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, February 2016 A discussion of how we can work to make the courts more accessible to litigants.
The rabbit and the turtle: Who wins—An examination of multi-district litigation on federal and state levels By Cyle Catlett & Hon. E. Kenneth Wright Bench and Bar, September 2014 An explanation of federal multidistrict litigation and Illinois’ state multidistrict litigation, and analysis of why the Illinois format is superior.
The forlorn and forgotten affidavit comes to life (again) By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, January 2014 A helpful guide to affidavits.
The exit—Illinois Supreme Court Chief Justice moves on: An interview with Justice Thomas Kilbride By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, November 2013 The former Chief Justice reflects on his term and discusses his future.
Pro se, alias, service of process, return of service—What language is this? By Jenea Wilson, Jessy Richert, & Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, September 2013 A guide for average people (and maybe lawyers and judges) to help navigate through the tempestuous waters of filing or defending a small case in court.
Partial Impartiality and Illinois Judicial disqualification: Problems, prospects, and possibilities By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr., Sabena Auyeung, & Christos Dimoulis Bench and Bar, February 2013 While maintaining complete impartiality is an honorable pursuit, is it possible for judges to leave their life experiences and common sense “at the courtroom door”? Must personal perspectives, morals, and values be traded in for a black robe?
How far can a raptor (vulture) spread its wings? Internet jurisdiction in the digital age—Wow! By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, December 2012 A complicated jurisdictional dispute can arise both here and in a foreign country when a U.S. Internet service provider offers a variety of services such as search engine, e-mail, auctions, etc. that contain content that violates laws in that country.
How to create a (legal) hornet’s nest By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, October 2012 Deutsche Bank v. Brewer involves service by publication in a Cook County foreclosure case.
The Pro Se Litigant: Small Claim Pro Se Court By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, September 2012 The Circuit Court’s Small Claims Pro Se Division serves the dual process of providing meaningful access to self-represented litigants, while also promoting judicial economy.
Jurors permitted to ask questions By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. & Sabena Auyeung Bench and Bar, July 2012 While trial judges in Illinois and other states have, in the past, allowed jurors to ask questions, Rule 243 and the accompanying revisions to the Pattern Jury Instructions Civil now provide a structure for trial judges in Illinois to allow juror questions if the parties agree.
Don’t check your common sense at the door By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, June 2012 Some examples of ARDC cases where, at first glance, an attorney's shortcut or omission seemed negligible, but very quickly turned into a serious infraction. 
A pro se’s struggles in an e-business world By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2012 One must keep in mind that the mere existence and dissemination of electronics and technology does not necessarily translate to the general population’s ability to use it.
One bite at the apple: Examining pro se litigants’ right to appointed counsel in civil cases By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, October 2011 The Sixth Amendment ensures that individuals facing criminal charges have the right to appointed counsel; however, no such right exists in the civil realm. Whether a court appoints counsel to a pro se litigant in a civil case largely depends on court resources as well as the availability of pro bono programs.
Perceptions of justice and fairness for pro se litigants By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, May 2011 The question of pro se litigants’ access to courts and the amount of permissible judicial interference in their cases demands our full attention.
An inward look By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, March 2011 A reminder that judges should always strive to be patient and dignified.
A fresh perspective on the judicial system By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. & Kalisa Gary Young Lawyers Division, February 2011 Read 13-year-old Kalisa Gary's award-winning essay on the subject of "keeping an impartial balance of life, accepting all divisions of fairness."
A fresh perspective on the judicial system By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. & Kalisa Gary Bench and Bar, December 2010 Read 13-year-old Kalisa Gary's award-winning essay on the subject of "keeping an impartial balance of life, accepting all divisions of fairness."
Letter to young lawyers—Basic tips and presentation of evidence By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Young Lawyers Division, August 2010 Judge E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. offers some words of wisdom to help new attorneys in their practice.
A refresher course on continuances—Stumbling blocks and issues for practitioners and judges to consider By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, August 2010 A review of the proper procedures for motioning and obtaining a continuance, and a discussion of the common issues raised on appeal and steps courts can take to ensure their decisions are upheld on review.
Practical jury trial tips to improve your litigation practice By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, February 2010 Jury trials come in all shapes and sizes. Since the players, facts and awards differ, attorneys must approach each case anew. Never assume you can “wing it” because you have over 20 years of experience in the courtroom, or a partner told you not to worry about it. Too many cases are won or lost because of an attorney’s lack of preparation, or worse, lack of knowledge about the law.
Sunrise with Judge Sandra Otaka By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. Bench and Bar, July 2009 The author remembers Judge Sandra Otaka, who passed away in June of 2009.
Book review By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. & Hon. Daniel T. Gillespie Bench and Bar, June 2009 Lincoln scholar Douglas L. Wilson has penned a fascinating account of our sixteenth President’s extraordinary ability to communicate with the written word.
The other shoe drops: Reflections on Illinois’ Long–Arm Statute By Hon. E. Kenneth Wright, Jr. & Baseer Tajuddin Bench and Bar, October 2006 The Illinois Long-Arm Statute, 735 ILCS 5/2-209, poses a conceptual dilemma for courts trying to discern it.

Pages


Spot an error in your article? Contact Sara Anderson at sanderson@isba.org. For information on obtaining a copy of an article,visit the ISBA Newsletters page.

Select a Different Author