Articles on Criminal justice

Case Note: People v. Drake By Steve Baker Criminal Justice, September 2019 A summary of People v. Drake, in which the court considered whether, in a double jeopardy sufficiency of evidence analysis, all evidence at trial—including improperly admitted evidence—should be considered when trial error justifies a remand for a new trial.
Bail reform—one year later By Kim D. Chanbonpin Criminal Justice, July 2019 A review of the changes in Illinois bail law one year after taking effect.
Criminal law practitioners beware: That supposed ‘non-conviction’ of supervision may count as a conviction under the federal sentencing guidelines By James A. Shapiro Criminal Justice, July 2019 The United States Sentencing Guidelines and Illinois supervision statute are at odds about whether supervision counts as a conviction.
An overview of mental health court By Ronald L. Lewis Criminal Justice, July 2019 Just over a decade ago, the Mental Health Court Treatment Act was passed to provide a problem-solving court for defendants whose mental illnesses were a major factor bringing them into contact with the criminal justice system.
Pandora’s box: The predicament of incarcerating mentally ill defendants in the Illinois Department of Corrections By Timothy James Ting Mental Health Law, May 2019 For many inexperienced prosecutors and defense attorneys, there may not be much of an understanding of the services that are offered by the Illinois Department of Corrections for mentally ill defendants and the difficulties in rehabilitating mentally ill offenders upon their release.
Newsflash By Linda J. Watson Criminal Justice, March 2019 Practice tips and legal updates for criminal practitioners. 
Illinois appellate court issues major decision regarding de facto life sentences for intellectually disabled By Lori G. Levin Criminal Justice, February 2019 The appellate court extended the imposition of de jure and de facto mandatory and discretionary sentences to intellectually disabled adults in People of the State of Illinois v. William Coty.
Police officers’ training & defendants with mental health issues By Jessica Fangman Criminal Justice, February 2019 Despite the obvious need for sensitivity to mental health issues, law enforcement officers in Illinois are not required to attend crisis intervention or mental health awareness training.
SORA on appeal after People v. Bingham By Julia Kaye Wykoff & Mark Kevin Wykoff Criminal Justice, February 2019 The Illinois Supreme Court recently considered the constitutionality of the Sex Offender Registration Act in People v. Bingham.
Pandora’s box: The predicament of incarcerating mentally ill defendants in the Illinois Department of Corrections By Timothy James Ting Criminal Justice, December 2018 For many inexperienced prosecutors and defense attorneys, there may not be much of an understanding of the services that are offered by the Illinois Department of Corrections for mentally ill defendants and the difficulties in rehabilitating mentally ill offenders upon their release.
Cellphone data – Constitutional protections continue to expand By Stephen Baker Criminal Justice, October 2018 An overview of Carpenter v. United States, in which the U.S. Supreme Court determined whether the government conducts a search under the Fourth Amendment when it accesses historical cell phone records to chronicle a user’s past locations when possessing the phone.
Is it time for no-name criminal juries in Cook County? By Hon. Charles P. Burns, Ana Montelongo, Darryl Auguste, & Ross Steinberg Criminal Justice, October 2018 A look at how jurors’ stress caused by privacy and safety concerns in the digital age of instant information affects the fairness of the judicial system.
Legislation: 2018 bills update By Stephen Baker Criminal Justice, October 2018 A compiled table of some of the new laws that the Illinois legislature has passed in the last year.
Curtilage and the Carroll Doctrine Criminal Justice, June 2018 An overview of the U.S. Supreme Court case Collins v. Virginia.
People v. Perkins and the right to pro se representation By Geraldine D’Souza Criminal Justice, June 2018 In People v. Perkins, the appellate court decided two distinct but very important issues. 
A public defender’s office is not a ‘law firm’ for purposes of determining conflicts in multiple defendant cases By Ronald L. Lewis Criminal Justice, June 2018 In People v. Cole, the Illinois Supreme Court addressed whether a trial court could properly appoint a public defender’s office to more than one defendant in a multi-defendant case.

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