Articles on Human Rights

Disability Rights on the Global Stage By Abigael Schulz Human and Civil Rights, May 2022 Disability rights incorporate basic human rights principles that should be integral to all societies. Has the United States failed to protect those rights on the international stage?
Resolution of the Human and Civil Rights Section Council of the Illinois State Bar Association Human and Civil Rights, May 2022 In response to the recent Russian invasion of Ukraine, on March 28 the Human and Civil Rights Section Council adopted a resolution condemning Russia’s actions within Ukraine and expressing support for the Ukrainian people.
‘Technicality Can Bring Fairness’ By Michael J. Maslanka Human and Civil Rights, May 2022 Knowingly or not, the Illinois Supreme Court upheld Article 10 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights in its recent decision in People v. Moon.
Upcoming CLE: Spring 2022 Illinois Human Rights Update Human and Civil Rights, May 2022 On May 19, 2022, the Human & Civil Rights Section will be presenting a webinar entitled Illinois Human Rights Update: Spring 2022.
Illinois Department of Human Rights Releases Model Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Program By Bhavani Raveendran Elder Law, July 2020 On April 28, 2020, the Illinois Department of Human Rights released its Model Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Program in compliance with the Workplace Transparency Act.
Illinois Department of Human Rights Releases Model Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Program By Bhavani Raveendran Human and Civil Rights, June 2020 On April 28, 2020, the Illinois Department of Human Rights released its Model Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Program in compliance with the Workplace Transparency Act.
USCIS Revised Fee Waiver Requirements Impact on Pathways to Legal Immigration By Bhavani Raveendran International and Immigration Law, April 2020 In October, USCIS announced that it would be removing the means-tested benefit criteria in determining whether an applicant was exempt from filing fees.
Human Rights Section Chair Appointed to Guardianship and Advocacy Commission By Ronald S. Langacker Human and Civil Rights, March 2020 Kathryn Eisenhart, past chair of the Human RIghts Section Council, was recently appointed by Governor Pritzker to be a member of the Illinois Guardianship and Advocacy Commission.  
December 10, 2019, Marks the 71st Human Rights Day Human and Civil Rights, December 2019 The United Nations commemorated Human Rights Day on December 10, 2019, marking the 71st year since the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
USCIS Revised Fee Waiver Requirements Impact on Pathways to Legal Immigration By Bhavani Raveendran Human and Civil Rights, December 2019 In October, USCIS announced that it would be removing the means-tested benefit criteria in determining whether an applicant was exempt from filing fees.
New Legislation Advances Human Rights in Illinois By Ronald S. Langacker Human and Civil Rights, September 2019 During an era where individual human rights are under siege on a national level, the state of Illinois has enacted significant legislation to not only protect existing human rights, but also to enhance them.
Working collaboratively to end human trafficking By Judge Ann Breen-Greco Women and the Law, June 2019 Three legal associations are now working together to address human trafficking.
ConTextos provides creative outlet for pre-trial detainees By Ronald S. Langacker Human and Civil Rights, March 2019 One of the objectives of the human rights movement is to reinforce that every individual deserves protections, while concurrently finding a way to balance the individual’s needs against the needs of a criminal justice system that protects society at large.
Cases to watch By Ronald S. Langacker Human and Civil Rights, December 2018 Nielsen v. Preap challenged the government’s interpretation of a 1996 mandatory detention law requiring that non-citizens be detained for the duration of their deportation proceedings—without a hearing—because they have criminal records.
Juliana v. United States: The constitutional side of the fight against climate change By Bhavani Raveendran Human and Civil Rights, December 2018 In Juliana v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court heard argument on whether it should stay a group of children and young adults’ attempt to hold the federal government accountable for not doing enough to stabilize our climate.
A human rights decision in disguise? By Michael J. Maslanka Human and Civil Rights, October 2018 An overview of People v. Kochevar, a recent appellate case.
Recent amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act By Ronald S. Langacker Human and Civil Rights, October 2018 An overview of amendments made to the Illinois Human Rights Act, which will help to streamline the charge filing process and provide more avenues through which to seek remedies for discrimination.
The United States left the Human Rights Council…. So what? By Bhavani Raveendran Human and Civil Rights, October 2018 The withdrawal of the United States from the Human Rights Council of the United Nations may have a far greater effect than envisioned.
What about the children? A glance into the treatment of immigrant minors forcibly separated from their families By Alejandra Palacios Human and Civil Rights, October 2018 As the number of immigrant children sent to shelters increases, so do allegations of abuse against the shelters housing them.
Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission By Kathryn Eisenhart Human and Civil Rights, August 2018 A summary of the U.S. Supreme Court opinion Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, in which the Court ruled that it is lawful under the First Amendment to refuse to create a cake for a same-sex couple to celebrate same-sex marriage based on religious beliefs.
A call for downstate bail reform By Evan Bruno Human and Civil Rights, December 2017 Human Rights Section Chair Evan Bruno argues that "If Cook County can survive with a $100 cap on all 'bail bond costs,' surely other Illinois counties can as well."
Fourteenth Amendment: The world’s first human rights law By Kathryn E. Eisenhart Human and Civil Rights, December 2017 The 150th anniversary of the adoption of the 14th Amendment gives us, as members of the bar, an opportunity to educate the people of Illinois on the amendment’s history and its everyday application in the laws and courts of this country.
The Seventh Circuit’s decision in Hively signals protection for transgender individuals By Juliet Berger-White & Charlie Wysong Bench and Bar, May 2017 The Seventh Circuit recently became the first circuit court to hold that Title VII’s prohibition of sex discrimination applies to discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.
Did your mother ever tell you to wear clean underwear because… ? By Michael J. Maslanka Human and Civil Rights, April 2017 A summary of Mulvania, et al. v. Sheriff of Rock Island County, et al., currently pending in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of Illinois.
Illinois Commission on Human Rights to be consolidated into the Illinois Department of Human Rights By Mark E. Wojcik Human and Civil Rights, April 2017 Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner issued three Executive Orders on March 31, 2017 to consolidate various state government agencies.
Justice delayed is justice denied By Kathryn Eisenhart Human and Civil Rights, April 2017 Until very recently the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, like all Federal Courts of Appeal, had held that “sex” under Title VII did not include sexual orientation or sexual preference.
Punishing poverty: Part II By Michelle A. Jenkins Human and Civil Rights, April 2017 The second of this two-part look at Illinois' bail bond system, in which author Michelle Jenkins argues that the current system ultimately burdens those it intends to protect.
Punishing Poverty: Part I By Michelle A. Jenkins Human and Civil Rights, March 2017 In the first of this two-part look at Illinois' bail bond system, author Michelle Jenkins argues that the current system ultimately burdens those it intends to protect.
Being locked up does not mean being locked out from medical care for serious medical needs which ARE protected by the eighth amendment right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment By Glenn R. Gaffney & Jolianne S. Walters Human and Civil Rights, December 2016 While cruel and unusual punishment can take many forms, the deliberate indifference to an inmate’s serious medical condition presents one of the more egregious and often-encountered violations of an inmate’s Eighth Amendment rights.
Comments from the Chair By Shannon Shepherd Human and Civil Rights, December 2016 Section Chair Shannon Shepherd shares her thoughts on the post-election impact on human rights.

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