Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Open Meetings Act

E-mail use—When does it constitute a meeting? By John H. Brechin Local Government Law, January 2007 Public Act 94-1058 effective January 1, 2007, amends the Open Meetings Act and specifically authorizes members of a public body to attend meetings of that public body without being physically present at the sight of the meeting.
Chair’s Column: The Illinois Open Meetings Act goes electronic By James W. Chipman Administrative Law, September 2006 Thanks to revisions over the last two legislative sessions, the Illinois Open Meetings Act has joined the electronic age.
New amendments to the Open Meetings Act require Web site posting By Galen T. Caldwell Government Lawyers, September 2005 Public Act 94-028, effective January 1, 2006, amends the Open Meetings Act (5 ILCS 120/1 et seq.) to require that: (1) notices; (2) agendas; and (3) minutes of regular meetings of a public body be posted on the public body’s Web site.
Recent case By Paul E. Freehling Administrative Law, September 2005 The recent Fourth District opinion in Henry v. Anderson, No. 04-04-0867 (Apr. 18, 2005), is a rare example of an appellate court ruling that Section 2a of the Illinois Open Meetings Act, 5 ILCS 120/2a, was violated. 
Attorney General’s office issues Open Meetings Act opinion By Lynn Patton Local Government Law, September 2004 Attorney General Lisa Madigan's office recently issued an opinion addressing the validity of action taken at a rescheduled regular meeting of the Johnson County Board.
Gerwin v. Livingston County Board1: The Open Meetings Act and its impact on hearings By Lisle A. Stalter Environmental Law, June 2004 American Disposal Services operates a landfill in unincorporated Livingston County, near Pontiac, Illinois.
Open Meetings Act- A convenient place lies somewhere between a broom closet and football stadium By John H. Brechin Local Government Law, April 2004 Gerwin involved an action by a citizen alleging that a meeting held by the defendant was in violation of the Open Meetings Act because it held a meeting at a location that was not convenient to the public.
Open Meetings Act- Right to participate By John H. Brechin Local Government Law, April 2004 The City of Cocoa enacted regulations limiting the right of non-resident to speak during its city council meetings.
High-tech hits home: Can local government officials use electronic communication tools without violating the sunshine laws? By Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. and Sharon L. Eiseman Administrative Law, July 2003 It is the public policy of this State that public bodies exist to aid in the conduct of the people's business and that the people have a right to be informed as to the conduct of their business
High-tech hits home: Can local government officials use electronic communication tools without violating the sunshine laws?* By Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. and Sharon L. Eiseman Government Lawyers, May 2003 It is the public policy of this State that public bodies exist to aid in the conduct of the people's business and that the people have a right to be informed as to the conduct of their business.
High-tech hits home: Can local government officials use electronic communication tools without violating the sunshine laws? By Alfred M. Swanson, Jr. and Sharon L. Eiseman Local Government Law, February 2003 It is the public policy of this State that public bodies exist to aid in the conduct of the people's business and that the people have a right to be informed as to the conduct of their business.
Opening the Meetings Act to reality—abolishing the “Rule of Two” By Richard G. Flood and Stewart H. Diamond Administrative Law, October 2001 Currently the Act prohibits the exercise of free speech between elected officials on public bodies containing five or fewer members. This stifles creativity in solving public problems and inhibits debate and frank discussion of the issues. Officials cannot test their assumptions and data in advance of a public forum.
Statutory developments By Robert John Kane Administrative Law, January 1999 The Illinois Administrative Procedure Act (IAPA) (5 ILCS 100/1-1 et seq.) has been amended by three Public Acts.