Publications

Section Newsletter Articles on Clients

Some things I learned along the way By James E. Buchmiller General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, September 2009 The author's list of things he's learned that books couldn't teach him.
Dealing with a difficult client By Ryan Bradley Young Lawyers Division, December 2008 The practice of law is difficult and challenging even while working with the best clients.
Difficult Conversations—Applying the principles from the best-selling book to the practice of law By Kim L. Kirn Women and the Law, October 2008 The practice of law is filled with difficult conversations: telling someone who has been severely injured that their case is worth less than they think; explaining child custody rules to a divorcing spouse; and explaining to the senior partner who hired you why you have decided to leave your law firm.
You want it when? By Donald E. Weihl Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, September 2008 Specific strategies that will permit breathing room without causing the client to feel the attorney is being unresponsive.
Do you want to know how you can enhance your relationship with your top-tier clients? Why not ask them? By John W. Olmstead Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, June 2008 As you well know, your top-tier business and other institutional clients often represent 20 percent of your clients and 80 percent of your business and fee revenue.
Making it rain By Jean A. Kenol Young Lawyers Division, June 2008 One of the most intimidating and daunting thoughts for any lawyer who decides to embark on a solo or small practice is wondering where the clients will come from.
Client communication should start at the beginning By Timothy J. Storm General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, May 2008 Communication lies at the heart of much of what attorneys do with, and for, clients.
Resolutions for 2008 By Mary A. Corrigan Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, April 2008 Although 2008 is already underway, it is not too late to implement some resolutions for improvement of your law practice.
Hello, young lawyers By Rory Weiler Family Law, October 2007 Experienced practitioners will agree that one of the most overlooked elements of the practice of law, and certainly one topic none of us heard much, if anything, about in law school is the art of client selection and management.
Trouble, with a capital “T” By Michael J. Rooney Real Estate Law, August 2007 There can be some serious pitfalls facing a lawyer who neither knows nor clarifies who the client is and what that client really wants to accomplish.
Approaching the total client in general practice By Patrick E. Ward General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, July 2007 Each person is the composite of the many parts which force or shape that person’s behavior. While respecting the role of free will, perceptions of options often narrow the field of choices and effectively dictate action taken.
Who is my client and what are my responsibilities under a power of attorney? By Myles Jacobs and Robert Duffin Real Estate Law, April 2007 You represent Bill and Mary in a transaction selling to Jack.
E-mail etiquette By Maxine R. Weiss Young Lawyers Division, February 2007 In today’s world of technology, many of us have fallen into the habit of e-mailing with our clients and opposing counsels.
Practice Tip: Know your client before you meet—Intake forms fill need By Lisa Olivero General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, November 2006 Over time the author has developed a short form that she now presents to potential clients when they appear for their initial consultation and before their first meeting.
Managing your relationship with pro bono clients By Lindsay Wilson Gowin Young Lawyers Division, October 2006 What if a lawyer and her pro bono client, after exhaustive discussion, cannot reach an agreement on tactics or strategy?
Practice Update: Who is your client? What document can you disclose By Bernard Wysocki General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, October 2006 From a practical standpoint, it is important when you see a potential third party involvement, to secure written retainer and defining your representation.
Practice tip: The importance of timely communications By Susan M. Brazas General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, March 2006 It’s a good problem to have: a staggering number of telephone calls, e-mails, referral letters, and curbside chats with people wondering whether they need a lawyer.
Practice tip: Dealing with difficult clients By Elizabeth A. Teague General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, February 2006 They are the ones that make you want to tear your hair out and can break your heart at the same time.
The second half of smart—How to temper your intelligence and become a more effective deal lawyer By Fred Tannenbaum Young Lawyers Division, February 2006 Some ideas for combining your vast body of knowledge and gift for conveying that intelligence with practical restraints to make negotiations and client relations smoother and more effective.
Exceptional client service in law firms: Tips for rewarding and recognizing employees By John W. Olmstead Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, December 2005 By regularly rewarding and recognizing your attorneys and staff when they exhibit positive client service behaviors, rather than only noticing and commenting when they do something wrong, you help motivate them to keep up the good work and internalize the behavior.
Exceptional client service in law firms: Tips on creating a client-focused culture By John W. Olmstead Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, December 2005 Why don’t lawyers embrace client service and realize that exceptional client service may be the most effective way of differentiating themselves from other lawyers and maintaining a competitive advantage?
Red flags By Bernard Wysocki General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, April 2005 The author describes nine 'red flag' clients-- if you see one coming, run for the hills.
The seven deadly sins of business e-mail By Eric M. Rosenberg Young Lawyers Division, April 2005 Since its inception, e-mail has been hailed justifiably as a productivity tool. But why should it also be productive for the prosecutor or plaintiff as a source of evidence? What can we do as lawyers to stop the creation and dissemination of troublesome electronic communications?
Five ways to make your client feel important By Trey Ryder Young Lawyers Division, February 2005 Often, clients change law firms because of what they perceive to be rudeness or the feeling of indifference by their lawyers.
Getting and keeping clients By John L. Nisivaco Young Lawyers Division, February 2005 The Illinois Rules of Professional Conduct contain three rules governing advertising in the legal profession. The rules are set forth below
The importance of being (Earnest)(Ernest) (Honest) By Matt Maloney General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, January 2005 I have, occasionally, commented about the importance of communicating with clients. I don't mean just talking to them, but trying to insure that they get the message.
Getting and keeping clients By John L. Nisivaco Young Lawyers Division, December 2004 As you know, attorneys licensed to practice law in Illinois are governed, in part, by the Rules of Professional Conduct (RPC).
Getting and keeping clients By John L. Nisivaco Young Lawyers Division, October 2004 Although attorneys are busy with their current cases, the importance of generating future business should never be underestimated.
Telephone calls from prospects: How to protect yourself from this two-edged sword By Trey Ryder Young Lawyers Division, October 2004 If you're like most lawyers, you know the value of speaking with a prospective client over the telephone before your first meeting.
Getting and keeping clients By John L. Nisivaco Young Lawyers Division, August 2004 Most lawyers understand the importance of networking, but they aren't sure how to do it.

Pages

Select a Different Subject