Articles From 2015

City of Chicago extends effective date of lease tax ruling until January 1, 2016 due to cloud tax concerns By David J. Kupiec, Natalie M. Martin, & Evan W. Schanerberger State and Local Taxation, August 2015 On June 30, 2015, the City of Chicago issued a release titled “Personal Property Tax Ruling 12 Effective 7-1-2015,” which officially extended the effective date of Lease Tax Ruling #12 from September 1, 2015 to January 1, 2016.
Civics education advances through LRE By Hon. Michael J. Chmiel Law Related Education for the Public, September 2015 Former LRE Committee Chair Mike Chmiel provides an update on the work of the Civics Education Subcommittee.
Civics in action: The Jacksonville Turner Walking Tour By Stephen Douglas Iden Law Related Education for the Public, March 2015 For the last 19 years, every September, the 7th graders of the Turner School in Jacksonville, Illinois, go on the annual Historic Walking Tour. The students go to several locations across Jacksonville as part of a living history experience.
Civics in our schools (Homes and communities) 2015 By Sandra Lin Sweeney Law Related Education for the Public, June 2015 The author considers civics education in schools and whether and how more students can become engaged.
CLAIM! A voice for the voiceless, opportunities to help women in need By John Bathke Young Lawyers Division, October 2015 The Chicago Legal Aid for Incarcerated Mothers (CLAIM) aims to give incarcerated women a voice and access to the justice system.
Claimant’s left knee injury while sitting on a chair and welding “arises out of his employment” By Cameron B. Clark Workers’ Compensation Law, December 2015 In Adcock v. IWCC, the appellate court reviewed the requirement that a claimant must show by a preponderance of the evidence that his injury “arose out of” and “in the course of” his employment in order to be compensable.
Class 7c tax incentive—Commercial Urban Relief Eligibility (CURE) By Brian Liston State and Local Taxation, June 2015 The Class 7c Tax Incentive provides the same tax relief as a Class 7a, 7b or 8 Tax Incentive; however, due to the relaxed requirements to obtain the Incentive, the Class 7c only lasts five years while the Class 7a, 7b or 8 lasts 12 years.
Client service agreements—Managing the broker relationship By Steven Pahl Insurance Law, September 2015 Client Service Agreements are available for the asking and have become increasingly common. When they are properly designed, constructed, and executed, they provide each party (but critically the policyholder) more certain redress for their insurance broker’s errors and omissions.
Cloud computing: An answer to cybersecurity? A feedback on the 20th European Intellectual Property Forum By Camille Conquer Corporate Law Departments, May 2015 An overview of this two-day conference held in Paris earlier this year.
Collecting money owed by the State of Illinois through the Illinois Court of Claims By Nathan Lollis Commercial Banking, Collections, and Bankruptcy, March 2015 A handy guide to collection cases filed in the Court of Claims. 
Comments from the editor By Craig R. Hedin Mineral Law, December 2015 Updates from Editor Craig Hedin.
Comments from the editor By Craig R. Hedin Mineral Law, August 2015 News and updated compiled by Editor Craig Hedin.
Comments from the editor By Craig R. Hedin Mineral Law, June 2015 Updates of interest to mineral law practitioners.
Comments from the editor By Craig R. Hedin Mineral Law, April 2015 Updates of interest to mineral law practitioners.
Comments from the editor By Craig R. Hedin Mineral Law, January 2015 Updates of interest to mineral law practitioners.
Comments in support of legislation establishing a bi-partisan and bicameral national commission to consider whether a value-added replacement tax should be a component of federal tax reform Federal Taxation, June 2015 It is time for Congress to take ownership of sweeping tax reform and an important first step is for the creation of a bi-partisan and bicameral National Commission to consider whether a value-added replacement tax should be a component of federal tax reform.
The Commission may find disability when the impairment rating is zero, but is an impairment rating required in all cases before the Commission can determine the nature and extent of an injury? By John W. Powers Workers’ Compensation Law, December 2015 On November 6, 2015, the Illinois Appellate Court filed its decision for Continental Tire of the Americas, LLC v. Illinois Workers’ Compensation Comm’n. holding the Commission may, as a matter of law, award permanency when an impairment rating is zero.
Committee on Government Lawyers co-sponsors “Human Trafficking and the Commercial Exploitation of Children” seminar By Eileen M. Geary Government Lawyers, April 2015 A summary of this popular program held in October 2014.
Common law retaliatory discharge By Shari R. Rhode Labor and Employment Law, June 2015 A summary of Flick v. Southern Illinois Healthcare, NFP.
Communication etiquette as a young lawyer—Responsiveness By Vincent A. Oppedisano Young Lawyers Division, October 2015 Developing a good sense of how to best reply to different communications will help you in your practice in a number of ways. Here are a few rules and general guidelines that should help.
Competitive, integrated employment: The next step in achieving community integration for people with disabilities By Cheryl R. Jansen Mental Health Law, December 2015 While it is important to celebrate the advances made by people with disabilities since the ADA was passed, it is equally important to examine what remains to be done.
The concept of “inherent power” does not divest a circuit court of its jurisdiction By George S. Bellas & Misty J. Cygan Bench and Bar, May 2015 In LVNV Funding, LLC v. Matthew Trice, the Illinois Supreme Court held that LVNV’s failure to register as a collection agency under the Collection Agency Act did not deprive the circuit court of jurisdiction.
The concept of “inherent power” does not divest a circuit court of its jurisdiction By George S. Bellas & Misty J. Cygan Civil Practice and Procedure, April 2015 In LVNV Funding, LLC v. Matthew Trice, the Illinois Supreme Court held that LVNV’s failure to register as a collection agency under the Collection Agency Act did not deprive the circuit court of jurisdiction.
Conditional residency in immigration family law cases: Who has the burden of proof? By Patrick M. Kinnally International and Immigration Law, November 2015 The court’s opinion in Gerardo Hernandez Lara v. Loretta E. Lynch explains precisely how USCIS, the immigration judge and BIA failed to understand the fundamental concepts of what constitutes a preponderance of the evidence and who has the burden of proof in a conditional residency waiver case.
Conditions on special use permits: Will they be upheld if challenged? By Lisle A. Stalter Local Government Law, December 2015 Special uses (also commonly referred to as “conditional uses”) are a great zoning tool for local governments to allow for uses that are infrequent and have unique impacts and yet are desirable.
Consent judgments for payment of attorney fees By Shannon L. Bradford Law Office Management and Economics, Standing Committee on, September 2015 Although lawyers should seek out good clients, good cases, and efficient procedures, nonpaying clients are inevitable. The author provides sample consent judgments, which may provide an efficient solution to the problem.
Constitution Day resources By Suzanne J. Schmitz Law Related Education for the Public, September 2015 Need a resource for Constitution Day, September 17, 2015? Or want some resources when teaching about the U.S. Constitution, U.S. history or civics?
A constitutional question about reduced jury size By Robert T. Park Civil Practice and Procedure, January 2015 Public Act 98-1132 goes into effect June 1, 2015. Trial lawyers will be keenly interested in the Act’s change to 735 ILCS 5/2-1105(b), which provides: “All jury cases shall be tried by a jury of 6.”
1 comment (Most recent January 16, 2015)
Constructive selection doctrine used to overcome two physician rule By Brittany N. Meeker Workers’ Compensation Law, February 2015 A summary of Bob Red Remodeling, Inc. v. Illinois Workers' Compensation Commission and Zenon Lemanski.
Contempt, social media, and the First Amendment in the Marriage of Weddigen By Ashley D. DiFilippo Civil Practice and Procedure, November 2015 In In re the Marriage Weddigen, the court discusses what constitutes civil contempt, whether a purge order is constitutional, and how the first amendment affects a person’s activity on social media.

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