Articles From 2002

Scam alert! Nigerian global scam in full flower By Lee Beneze Elder Law, May 2002 Over the past months, what certainly must be tens, if not hundreds of thousands of letters purporting to be from Nigeria, or elsewhere in West Africa, have been e-mailed to Americans.
Scanner clean-up techniques for WordPerfect and Word By Marilyn Monrose Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, December 2002 Cleaning up scanned documents in WordPerfect is fairly easy once you know what to look for. Even though OCR technology has improved a lot over the years, there are still some things it can't do and being that WordPerfect is a code-driven program, some unexpected problems are always likely to turn up.
Scanning irreplaceable documents in case of disaster By Marilyn Monrose Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, May 2002 Many things have changed since September 11, especially the way we do business. Law firms that resided in the World Trade Center lost untold thousands of documents.
School choice under the “Individuals with Disabilities Act Amendments of 1997” By Mark J. Carroll Child Law, January 2002 Prior to 1975, disabled children and their parents were provided little protection by the federal government against states who excluded disabled children from the educational system because of their disability.
School referenda: 61 pecent pass, 39 percent fail— March 19, 2002 By Marcy Dutton Education Law, May 2002 Results of the March 19 referenda on questions to raise school district tax rates and to issue bonds reveal that 69 of the 114 questions, or 61 percent, were successful and that 45 or 39 percent of the questions were defeated.
School violence and discipline of special education students By Richard S. Gutoff Child Law, May 2002 School violence resulting in fatalities has occurred 11 times since 1997. These acts of violence were committed by troubled students.
Scrivener’s error: validity of a sworn report By Lawrence W. Terrell Traffic Laws and Courts, February 2002 The recent appellate court decision of People vs. Wyzgowski1 held that a scrivener's error did not affect the validity of the officer's sworn report.
The Second and Fifth Circuits disagree over the scope of the Foreign Trade Antitrust Improvements Act By John L. Conlon October 2002 Each year the United States and other nations become more integrated into a global economy.
Second Circuit upholds denial of Random House injunction request By Steven L. Baron Intellectual Property, June 2002 When it comes to publishing rights, is there a difference between a book and an e-book? According to one New York court, the answer is yes.
Second District addresses the court’s failure to admonish By Kathryn Bischoff Child Law, October 2002 Two seemingly opposite opinions have recently been handed down by the Second District Appellate Court on the issue of disturbing a finding of unfitness based on the trial court's failure to admonish a parent to comply with the conditions of the DCFS service plan.
Secret agendas and the Illinois Open Meetings Act* By Mark E. Wojcik Government Lawyers, December 2002 The Illinois Open Meetings Act is designed to give citizens advance notice of all meetings at which any business of a public body is discussed or acted upon in any way.
Section council resolves to support right-to-sue legislative amendment to Illinois Human Rights Act By Glenn R. Gaffney Labor and Employment Law, March 2002 The ISBA's Labor and Employment Law Section Council has resolved to support the concept of proposed legislation which would amend the Illinois Human Rights Act so as to allow complainants the right to file suit in circuit court.
Securing the right to receive government payments under revised article 9 By Jeffrey A. Mollet Commercial Banking, Collections, and Bankruptcy, May 2002 Whether a security interest in government program payments is perfected has always been at the center of debate, generally in the bankruptcy or "farmer-in-distress" context, and the issue remains largely unresolved by the recent revisions to Article 9 of the Illinois Uniform Commercial code which took effect on July 1, 2001
Securing the right to receive government payments under revised Article 9 By Jeffrey A. Mollet Agricultural Law, January 2002 Whether a security interest in government program payments is perfected has always been at the center of debate, generally in the bankruptcy or "farmer-in-distress" context, and the issue remains largely unresolved by the recent revisions to Article 9 of the Illinois Uniform Commercial Code that took effect on July 1, 2001.
Securities broker-dealers and money laundering: the obligations of broker-dealers under money laundering laws By Sarah B. Estes Corporate Law Departments, April 2002 Money laundering has been a "hot issue" for securities regulators for some time, and after September 11, it got even hotter.
Selling your business: Ten tactics to close By Martin Kupferman Corporate Law Departments, September 2002 You knew when it was time to sell your business. And now that you are, your selling strategy is on target and you're moving forward nicely
Send in your nominations: Tradition of Excellence Award By Donald A. LoBue General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, December 2002 It has been my privilege to be associated with the General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Section's Tradition of Excellence Award for the last few years.
The Senior Citizens Real Estate Tax Deferral Act Elder Law, December 2002 The Senior Citizens Real Estate Tax Deferral Act, 320 ILCS 30/1 et seq., enables senior citizens to defer paying their real estate taxes until after their death, a sale of the real estate, or a failure to qualify for the program.
The Senior Health Insurance Program—SHIP By Bryan Padget Elder Law, May 2002 The Senior Health Insurance Program, or SHIP, is a free insurance counseling service for Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers.
Senior lawyers help the community By Stanley B. Balbach Elder Law, December 2002 Whether you are a volunteer in civic activities, alumni groups, retiree's organizations, or a political organization, you are, by participating, making a difference to an organization and to your community.
Service of process by special order of court By Dawn R. Hallsten Civil Practice and Procedure, December 2002 Under 735 ILCS 5/2-203.1, a plaintiff may seek leave of the court to serve the defendant by special order of court if the plaintiff has diligently but unsuccessfully attempted to serve the defendant personally or by abode service.
Serving the uncooperative defendant By Larry A. Appelbaum Tort Law, May 2002 Unfortunately, the case hasn't moved because the defendant has not been served. Everyone is getting frustrated, the judge, the client and yourself. How do you get the defendant into court?
The settlement conference program U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit Alternative Dispute Resolution, February 2002 Pursuant to FRAR Rule 33, the court conducts conferences to encourage and facilitate the settlement of civil appeals.
Seventh Circuit clarifies standards for the grant or denial of summary judgment in retaliation cases By Michael R. Lied Labor and Employment Law, May 2002 In Stone v. City of Indianapolis Public Utilities Division, 2002 U.S. App. LEXIS 2523 (7th Cir. 2002), the court of appeals set forth standards for the grant or denial of summary judgment in cases alleging retaliation for filing a discrimination charge or engaging in some other protected activity.
Seventh Circuit decision discusses “deferral” of information as violation of 10b-5 By Howard Z. Gopman Business and Securities Law, February 2002 In Gallagher v. Abbott Laboratories et al, 269 F.3d 806 (7th Circuit 2001), the court discussed the duty to disclose bad news in light of section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. See 15 U.S.C.A. § 78j(b); 17 C.F.R. § 240.10b-5.
Seventh Circuit rejects punitive damage recovery based on truck driver’s intentional driver log falsification and excessive driving By William D. Brejcha Energy, Utilities, Telecommunications, and Transportation, February 2002 The U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago has affirmed a defense summary judgment on a punitive damage claim arising from a truck driver's alleged habitual sleep deprivation and intentional log falsification in Purnick v. C.R. England, Inc., 269 F.3d 851 (7th Cir., 10/19/01).
Seventh Circuit reverses ERISA award for Central States By William D. Brejcha Energy, Utilities, Telecommunications, and Transportation, February 2002 The U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago has reversed a sixteen million dollar ($16,000,000) withdrawal liability judgment against the owners of a bankrupt motor carrier in Central States, Southeast And Southwest Areas Pension Fund v. White, 2001 W.L. 818782 (7th Cir., July 20, 2001).
Seventh Circuit reverses tax court on transportation law issue By William D. Brejcha Energy, Utilities, Telecommunications, and Transportation, February 2002 The U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago reversed a decision of the Tax Court on an important transportation tax law issue in U.S. Freightways Corp. v. IRS, No. 00-2668 (11/6/01).
Seventh Circuit tackles Carmack jurisdictional issues in botched bedroom furniture move By William D. Brejcha Energy, Utilities, Telecommunications, and Transportation, February 2002 The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit has affirmed in part and reversed in part a trial court dismissal of a combination RICO/state fraud/ Carmack Amendment claim that arose out of a botched purchase and move of a purportedly Italian made set of walnut bedroom furniture in Pizzo v. Bekin Van Lines Company, 2001 WL 818772 (7th Cir. July 20, 2001).
Seventh Circuit voids arbitration agreement requiring plaintiff to pay his own costs and attorney fees By Glenn R. Gaffney Labor and Employment Law, July 2002 On April 4, 2002, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of McCaskill v. SCI Management Corp., 285 F. 3d 623 ( 7th Cir. 2002) struck as unenforceable an arbitration agreement which required the plaintiff to pay her own costs and attorney fees in a Title VII action.

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