Articles From 2002

Termination: two and two for the spring By Terrence M. Madsen Child Law, January 2002 The parental rights termination provisions of 750 ILCS 50/1 went two and two this spring in the constitutional challenge area.
Thank you, Bud! Workers’ Compensation Law, January 2002 Arbitrator Bernard Barasa retired from the Industrial Commission effective October 31, 2001.
Think membership doesn’t have its benefits? Think again Young Lawyers Division, June 2002 In the next few weeks you will receive your annual dues statement, asking you to renew your membership with the ISBA.
Third circuit finds railroad to be Carmack shipper By William D. Brejcha Energy, Utilities, Telecommunications, and Transportation, October 2002 The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit found a railroad to be a Carmack Amendment shipper in Union Pacific Railroad Co. v. Greentree Transportation Trucking Co., 2002 U.S. App. LEXIS 11372 and 2002 Fed. Car. Cases &84,234, p.58,182, decided May 16, 2002
Three Web sites keep you up to date on immigration law By Shannon M. Shepherd International and Immigration Law, June 2002 Looking for a quick, easy way to get up to date on the latest developments in immigration law? Try three Web sites for a comprehensive look at what's happening in Immigration.
Tips for giving a better opening statement By Gerald L. Montroy Young Lawyers Division, December 2002 It is difficult to overestimate the importance of the opening statement. The jury develops its first impression at this time.
To buy or not to buy: Who gets the shaft? By James K. Weston, Sr. Mineral Law, November 2002 Over the long term, ownership of severed mineral estates and interests has been stable.
To our readers Employee Benefits, May 2002 Our fourth newsletter of the 2001-2002 year includes two interesting updates regarding recent case law that pertains to employee benefit plans and retirement programs.
To our readers Employee Benefits, January 2002 Our third newsletter of the 2001-2002 year includes an interesting article regarding a recent decision of the U.S.
Tort claims of minors against school districts: One-year or two-year statute of limitations? By Michael J. Perona Tort Law, October 2002 A new hot topic has arisen regarding the issue of which statute of limitations to apply when minors have a tort claim against local governmental entities or employees, specifically school districts.
Touchy, touchy—substitution of judge By Thomas F. Hartzell General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, January 2002 In many of the smaller counties there may be only one circuit judge who the attorneys appear before almost every time they have court business.
Trademark and trade dress may be covered By Stanley C. Nardoni Corporate Law Departments, October 2002 A series of Illinois Appellate Court decisions place trademark and trade dress infringement among the offenses typically covered by the advertising injury provisions of general liability policies
Trademark Trial and Appeals Board issues first dilution decision By John E. Lyhus Intellectual Property, April 2002 The Trademark Trial and Appeals Board of the United States Patent and Trademark Office has revealed the high barrier a trademark must surmount to be considered famous under the Federal Trademark Dilution Act (FTDA).
Trailing Cybercrime By James Bumgarner Legal Technology, Standing Committee on, May 2002 Hastened by the September 11th attack on the United States, we now have in place a procedure for global cooperation in the search for crimes being planned, having been committed, and in commission.
Trial pratice notes: civil jury instructions—an update and comments By Patrick J. Hitpas General Practice, Solo, and Small Firm, May 2002 If you are a lawyer who does not concentrate in personal injury cases, you may not have the opportunity to try jury trials on a regular basis.
A tribute to Professor Harold (Hank) W. Hannah By Donald L. Uchtmann & Margaret Rosso Grossman Agricultural Law, April 2002 Harold "Hank" Winford Hannah, a respected lawyer, teacher and scholar, died November 20, 2001 in Mt. Vernon, Illinois, just a few miles from his rural Texico home.
The trouble-shooter’s checklist By Donna J. Cunningham Business and Securities Law, July 2002 This checklist is meant to list those non-tax factors that most often lead to trouble, disagreement, or failure of the business.
Tuesday Topics continue International and Immigration Law, April 2002 The International & Immigration Law Section continue to implement the Tuesday Topic series with three more programs in the first half of 2002.
The tune of the ADA song as applied to local government employment and land use regulation in the seventh circuit: “the side with the best evidence wins.” By Jeffrey D. Lester Local Government Law, July 2002 In two recent seventh circuit cases involving the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and local government, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals sang a dominant theme, irrespective of the "title" of the Act involved: the most in-tune evidence won each case.
Twelve initial steps for corporate governance compliance By Jerold N. Siegan Commercial Banking, Collections, and Bankruptcy, December 2002 Since the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate governance law, you have probably read or heard about the various new and complex responsibilities imposed upon your business and the new penalties that will result if you or your company fail to comply with them
Twelve tips for prepping employees for deposition By Michael Todd Scott Corporate Law Departments, November 2002 Most in-house counsel will at some time have to prep an employee for deposition.
Twinning Project revisited International and Immigration Law, October 2002 The Illinois State Bar Association and the Naczelnej Rady Adwokackiej (National Bar Association of Poland) have had a working relationship since 1990.
UCITA is coming! UCITA is coming! (One if by land, two if by C) By Eugene F. Friedman Business Advice and Financial Planning, June 2002 The Illinois General Assembly has recently witnessed the introduction of the Uniform Computer Information Transfer Act (UCITA), 1999 Illinois Senate Bill 1309.
UCITA is coming! UCITA is coming! (One if by land, two if by C) By Eugene F. Friedman Intellectual Property, April 2002 The Illinois General Assembly has recently witnessed the introduction of the Uniform Computer Information Transfer Act ("UCITA"), 1999 Illinois Senate Bill 1309.
Unauthorized practice of law and in-house counsel By Michael Todd Scott Commercial Banking, Collections, and Bankruptcy, March 2002 There has been a lot of discussion lately on unauthorized practice of law (UPL) by in-house counsel.
Unauthorized practice of law in administrative proceedings By Claire A. Manning & Richard R. McGill, Jr. Government Lawyers, August 2002 Administrative agencies deciding contested cases need to be aware that the parties before them may have to be represented by an attorney.
Unauthorized practice of law in administrative proceedings By Claire A. Manning & Richard R. McGill Environmental Law, April 2002 Administrative agencies deciding contested cases need to be aware that the parties before them may have to be represented by an attorney.
Unauthorized practice of law in administrative proceedings By Claire A. Manning Administrative Law, April 2002 Administrative agencies deciding contested cases need to be aware that the parties before them may have to be represented by an attorney.
The unauthorized practice of law in modern real estate transactions Quinlan & Tyson remains instructive and enforceable By Joseph R. Fortunato & William J. Anaya Real Estate Law, May 2002 It is no surprise to real estate lawyers that non-lawyers involved in related real estate business are devising creative methods designed to increase their market share and their profits.
Underfunded defined benefit plans: The end of the pension holiday By Teresa Faherty Blomquist Employee Benefits, December 2002 A line from Hamlet describes the uneasy juxtaposition of a wedding party and a funeral: "The funeral bak'd meats / Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables."

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