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2019 Articles

Banning Facial Recognition in Chicago: A Moral and Legal Necessity By Michael Drake September 2019 As technology advances, our society has to weigh the costs of reducing privacy against benefits such as societal safety, innovation, and economic growth.
The census citizenship question By Bhavani Raveendran June 2019 In April, the U.S. Supreme Court considered whether the district court erred in enjoining the secretary of the Department of Commerce from reinstating a question about citizenship to the 2020 census.
Chair’s column By Kathryn E. Eisenhart March 2019 A note from the chair, Kathryn E. Eisenhart.
ConTextos provides creative outlet for pre-trial detainees By Ronald S. Langacker March 2019 One of the objectives of the human rights movement is to reinforce that every individual deserves protections, while concurrently finding a way to balance the individual’s needs against the needs of a criminal justice system that protects society at large.
Illinois Prohibits Discrimination Against Jurors Based on Their Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity By Mark E. Wojcik September 2019 State legislation signed in August 2019 will make Illinois the sixth state to prohibit the use of peremptory challenges to strike jurors based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.
Meet the section council By Kathryn E. Eisenhart June 2019 A spotlight on Kathryn E. Eisenhart, chair of the Human Rights Law Section Council.
New Legislation Advances Human Rights in Illinois By Ronald S. Langacker September 2019 During an era where individual human rights are under siege on a national level, the state of Illinois has enacted significant legislation to not only protect existing human rights, but also to enhance them.
Review of ‘Doing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law’ by Preet Bharara By Kathryn E. Eisenhart June 2019 A review of Preet Bharara's book on justice based on his experiences as a U.S. attorney.
Timbs v. Indiana: U.S. Supreme Court rules unanimously it’s unconstitutional for states to impose excessive fines By Ronald S. Langacker March 2019 Civil forfeiture clauses are common in many states, which sometimes rely on them as a revenue stream for local police departments. However, this creates an incentive for law enforcement to selectively make arrests based upon the potential funding. Timbs v. Indiana puts an effective end to this practice.
Wondering what your section council is up to? Find out at our next meeting March 2019 Please join us at the next ISBA Human Rights Council Business Meeting as we review section business, discuss legislative updates, and discuss future events.